eeft-20201231.htm
Large Accelerated Filer (i) As of the end of each fiscal quarter ended on March 31, September 30 and December 31, a Consolidated Total Leverage Ratio not to be greater than 3.5 to1.0; (ii) as of the end of each fiscal quarter ended on June 30, a Consolidated Total Leverage Ratio not to be greater than 4.0 to1.0; provided that, not more than two times prior to the expiration date, that a Material Acquisition has been consummated, for any period of four consecutive fiscal quarters following such Material Acquisition, the Consolidated Total Leverage Ratio will be not greater than 4.0 to1.0 for fiscal quarters ended on March 31, September 30 and December 31 and not greater than 4.5 to1.0 for fiscal quarters ended on June 30; provided, further, that following such four consecutive fiscal quarters for which the maximum Consolidated Total Leverage Ratio is increased, the maximum Consolidated Total Leverage Ratio shall revert to the levels set forth in clauses (i) and (ii) above for not fewer than two fiscal quarters before a subsequent Increase Notice is delivered to the syndicate of financial institutions; and (iii) a Consolidated Interest Coverage Ratio not less than 4.0 to 1.0. Subject to meeting certain leverage ratio and liquidity requirements as contained in the unsecured credit agreement, the Company is permitted to pay dividends, repurchase common stock and repurchase subordinated debt. 74-2806888 327-4200 false Yes Yes Yes EEFT26 EEFT Leawood 11400 Tomahawk Creek Parkway, Suite 300 KS NASDAQ DE NASDAQ false No EURONET WORLDWIDE, INC. 0001029199 false --12-31 2020 FY (913) The Company's state tax net operating loss carryforwards of $95.8 million will expire periodically from 2021 through 2040, U.S. foreign tax credit carryforwards of $61.3 million that will expire periodically from 2021 through 2027 and U.S. federal research and expenditure credit carryforwards of $3.3 million that will expire periodically from 2034 through 2038. false 0 21 U.K. Spain Greece Germany U.S. (Federal) false 5 false true 0 0 (i) On or after September 20, 2022 if the closing sale price of the Company's Common Stock has been at least 130% of the conversion price then in effect for at least 20 trading days (whether or not consecutive) during any 30 consecutive trading day period (including the last trading day of such period) ending on, and including, the trading day immediately preceding the date on which the Company provides notice of redemption and (ii) on or after March 20, 2025 and prior to the maturity date, regardless of the foregoing sale price condition, in each case at a redemption price equal to 100% of the principal amount of the Convertible Notes to be redeemed, plus accrued and unpaid interest to, but excluding, the redemption date. No sinking fund is provided for the Convertible Notes. In addition, if a fundamental change, as defined in the Indenture, occurs prior to the maturity date, holders may require the Company to repurchase for cash all or part of their Convertible Notes at a repurchase price equal to 100% of the principal amount of the Convertible Notes to be repurchased, plus accrued and unpaid interest to, but excluding, the fundamental change repurchase date. LIBOR plus 0.65% 0 0 001-31648 3 0 Under the Amendment, the Consolidated Total Leverage Ratio, as defined in the Credit Facility, was modified to reduce the amount of consolidated funded debt by the amount of cash and cash equivalents on the Company's consolidated balance sheet and the Consolidated Interest Coverage Ratio now includes a one-time option to reduce the ratio to 3.5 to 1.0 from 4.0 to 1.0 for a period of up to three consecutive quarters. During 2020, the Company granted 1,350,000 options that were valued using a Monte Carlo simulation due to market performance conditions included in the option grant. The Monte Carlo simulation calculated a fair value per option of $26.90 using the following assumptions: volatility of 37.0%, risk-free interest rate of 0.33%, and a term of 5.0 years. At the date of grant, the risk fee rate for stock options awarded in 2019 and 2018 was 1.7%, and 2.8%, respectively. Operating lease payments reflect the Company's current fixed obligations under the operating lease agreements. Certain ATM site leases contain termination options that grant the Company the option to terminate the lease prior to the stated term of the agreement. 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 UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

_________________________

FORM 10-K

_________________________



(Mark One)




ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934



 

For the fiscal year ended: December 31, 2020



 

OR



 

 



 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934



 

For the transition period from                 to


 

Commission File Number

001-31648

 

EURONET WORLDWIDE, INC.

(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)

________________________

 

Delaware 

74-2806888

(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

11400 Tomahawk Creek Parkway, Suite 300 
Leawood, Kansas  66211
(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)


(913) 327-4200

(Registrant's telephone number, including area code)


Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:


Title of Each Class

Trading Symbol(s)

Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered

Common Stock 

EEFT 

Nasdaq Global Select Market 

1.375% Senior Notes due 2026  

EEFT26 

Nasdaq Global Market 

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

_________________________

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes  No ☐


Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes ☐ No


Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes  No ☐


Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).Yes  No ☐


Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of "large accelerated filer," "accelerated filer," "smaller reporting company" and "emerging growth company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.


Large accelerated filer 


Accelerated filer

Non-accelerated filer 

 

Smaller reporting company

 

 


Emerging growth company

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report.


Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes ☐ No

 

As of June 30, 2020, the aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates of the registrant was approximately $4.8 billion. The aggregate market value was determined based on the closing price of the Common Stock on June 30, 2020.

 

As of February 19, 2021, the registrant had 52,752,851 shares of Common Stock outstanding.

 

Documents Incorporated By Reference

 

Portions of the registrant's Proxy Statement for its 2021 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, which will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission no later than 120 days after December 31, 2020, are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.


 

 



Table of Content




Item Number Item Description
Page




Part I

2
Item 1. Business
2
Item 1A.
Risk Factors
19
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments
33
Item 2. Properties
33
Item 3 Legal Proceedings
34
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
34




Part II

34
Item 5. Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
34
Item 6. Selected Financial Data
37
Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
38
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk
61
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
63
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
113
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures
113
Item 9B. Other Information
114




Part III

114
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
114
Item 11. Executive Compensation
114
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
114
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence
114
Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services
114




Part IV

115
Item 15. Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules
115





Signatures
118


1


 

Item 1. Business

 

References in this report to "we," "our," "us," the "Company" and "Euronet" refer to Euronet Worldwide, Inc. and its subsidiaries unless the context indicates otherwise.

 

Business Overview

 

General Overview

 

Euronet is a leading electronic payments processing provider. We offer payment and transaction processing and distribution solutions to financial institutions, agents, retailers, merchants, content providers, and individual consumers. Our primary product offerings include comprehensive automated teller machine ("ATM"), point-of-sale ("POS"), card outsourcing, card issuing and merchant acquiring services; software solutions and cloud based payment solutions; electronic distribution of electronic payment products; foreign exchange services and international payment services. 

 

Core Business Segments 

 

We operate in the following three segments as of December 31, 2020:

 

The Electronic Fund Transfer ("EFT") Processing Segment processes transactions for a network of 37,729 ATMs and approximately 340,000 POS terminals across Europe, the Middle East, Asia Pacific, and the United States. We provide comprehensive electronic payment solutions consisting of ATM cash withdrawal and deposit services, ATM network participation, outsourced ATM and POS management solutions, credit and debit card outsourcing, and card issuing and merchant acquiring services. In addition to our core business, we offer a variety of value added services, including ATM and POS dynamic currency conversion ("DCC"), domestic and international ATM surcharge, advertising, customer relationship management ("CRM"), mobile top-up, bill payment, fraud management, foreign remittance payout, cardless payout, banknote recycling solutions and tax-refund services. Through this segment, we also offer a suite of integrated electronic financial transaction software solutions for electronic payment and transaction delivery systems. In 2020, the EFT Processing Segment accounted for approximately 19% of Euronet's consolidated revenues.

 

The epay Segment provides distribution and processing of prepaid mobile airtime and other electronic content and payment processing services for various prepaid products, cards and services throughout our worldwide distribution network. We operate a network that includes approximately 748,000 POS terminals that enable electronic processing of prepaid mobile airtime "top-up" services and other digital media content in Europe, the Middle East, Asia Pacific, the United States and South America. We also provide vouchers and physical gift fulfillment services in Europe, gift card distribution and processing services in most of our markets and digital code distribution in a growing number of markets. In 2020, the epay Segment accounted for approximately 33% of Euronet's consolidated revenues.

The Money Transfer Segment provides global consumer-to-consumer money transfer services, primarily under the brand names Ria, AFEX, and IME, and global account-to-account money transfer services under the brand name xe. We offer services under the brand names Ria and IME through a network of sending agents, Company-owned stores (primarily in North America, Europe and Malaysia) and our websites (riamoneytransfer.com and online.imeremit.com), disbursing money transfers through a worldwide correspondent network that includes approximately 464,000 locations. xe is a provider of foreign currency exchange information on its currency data websites (www.xe.com and www.x-rates.com). We offer global account-to-account money transfer services through our websites (www.xe.com and https://transferxe.com) and xe customer service representatives. In addition to money transfers, we offer customers bill payment services (primarily in the U.S.), payment alternatives such as money orders, comprehensive check cashing services for a wide variety of issued checks, along with competitive foreign currency exchange services and mobile top-up. Through xe, we offer cash management solutions and foreign currency risk management services to small-and-medium sized businesses. We are one of the largest global money transfer companies measured by revenues and transaction volumes. In 2020, the Money Transfer Segment accounted for approximately 48% of Euronet's consolidated revenues.

2


Historical Perspective
  • 1994 - Euronet was established as Euronet Bank Access Kft., a Hungarian limited liability company.
  • 1997 - Euronet was reorganized in March 1997 in connection with its initial public offering, and at that time, our operating entities became wholly owned subsidiaries of Euronet Services, Inc., a Delaware corporation.
  • 1998 - In December 1998, we acquired Arkansas Systems, Inc. (now known as "Euronet USA"), a U.S.-based company that produces electronic payment and transaction delivery systems software for retail banks internationally.
  • 2001 - We changed our name from Euronet Services, Inc. to Euronet Worldwide, Inc. in August 2001.
  • 2003 - We added a complementary business line through the acquisition of epay Limited (“epay”), which had offices in the U.K. and Australia.
  • 2007 - We established the Money Transfer Segment after completing the acquisition of Los Angeles-based Ria, one of the largest global money transfer companies measured by revenues and transaction volumes.
  • 2015 - We completed the acquisition of IME (M) Sdn Bhd ("IME") which provided Euronet with immediate entry into the Asian and Middle East money transfer send markets. We also added a complementary business line through the acquisition of xe Corporation ("xe"), which provides currency-related data and international payment services.
  • 2019 REN Ecosystem goes live and the migration of legacy software to the REN Ecosystem begins.
  • Current - Euronet conducts business globally, serving customers in approximately 175 countries. As of December 31, 2020, we have 13 transaction processing centers, six in Europe, five in Asia Pacific and two in North America. We also maintain 66 business offices that are located in 43 countries. Our corporate offices are located in Leawood, Kansas, USA. 

Business Segment Overview

 

For a discussion of operating results by segment, please see Item 7 - Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, and Note 17, Business Segment Information, to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

EFT Processing Segment

 

Overview

 

Our EFT Processing Segment provides comprehensive electronic payment solutions consisting of ATM cash withdrawal and deposit services, ATM network participation, outsourced ATM and POS management solutions, credit and debit card outsourcing, card issuing and merchant acquiring services. In addition to our core business, we offer a variety of value added services, including ATM and POS DCC, domestic and international surcharge, advertising, CRM, prepaid mobile top-up, bill payment, money transfer, fraud management, foreign remittance payout, cardless payout, banknote recycling solutions and tax-refund services. We provide these services either through our Euronet-owned ATMs and POS terminals, through contracts under which we operate ATMs and POS terminals on behalf of our customers or, for certain services, as stand-alone products. Through this segment, we also offer a suite of integrated electronic financial transaction software solutions for electronic payment and transaction delivery systems. 

 

Sources of Revenues


The primary sources of revenues generated by our ATM network are recurring monthly management fees, transaction-based fees, surcharges and margins earned on DCC transactions. We receive fixed monthly fees under many of our outsourced management contracts. The EFT Processing Segment also generates revenues from POS operations and merchant management, card network management for credit, debit, prepaid and loyalty cards, prepaid mobile airtime recharge and other electronic content on ATMs and ATM advertising. We primarily service financial institutions across Europe, the Middle East, Asia Pacific, and the United States. As of December 31, 2020, we operated 37,729 ATMs compared to 46,070 at December 31, 2019. The decrease was largely due to temporary closures of ATMs in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. 

3


We monitor the number of transactions made by cardholders on our network. These include cash withdrawals, balance inquiries, deposits, prepaid mobile airtime recharge purchases, DCC transactions and certain denied (unauthorized) transactions. We do not bill certain transactions on our network to financial institutions, and we have excluded these transactions for reporting purposes. The number of transactions processed over our networks has increased over the last five years at a compound annual growth rate ("CAGR") of approximately 11.7% as indicated in the following table:


(in millions)

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

EFT Processing Segment transactions per year

1,885

2,352

2,721

3,052

3,275

 

The increase in transactions for 2020 is the result of a significant increase in the volume of lower value, digitally-initiated payment processing transactions for an Asia Pacific customer's bank wallet and e-commerce site.


Our processing centers for the EFT Processing Segment are located in Germany, Hungary, India, China, and Pakistan. Our processing centers run two types of proprietary transaction switching software: our legacy ITM software, which we have used and sold to financial institutions since 1998 through our Software Solutions unit, an innovative switching software package named "REN", which is hosted in Germany and India, that was released in 2017. The processing centers operate 24 hours a day, seven days a week. We have been progressively transitioning all of our networks to REN.

EFT Processing Products and Services

 

Outsourced Management Solutions

 

Euronet offers outsourced management solutions to financial institutions, merchants, mobile phone operators and other organizations using our processing centers' electronic financial transaction processing software. Our outsourced management solutions include management of existing ATM networks, development of new ATM networks, management of POS networks, management of automated deposit terminals, management of credit and debit card databases and other financial processing services. These solutions include 24-hour monitoring of each ATM's status and cash condition, managing the cash levels in each ATM, coordinating the cash delivery and providing automatic dispatches for necessary service calls. We also provide real-time transaction authorization, advanced monitoring, network gateway access, network switching, 24-hour customer service, maintenance, cash settlement and reconciliation, forecasting and reporting. Since our infrastructure can support a significant increase in transactions, new outsourced management solutions agreements should provide additional revenue with lower incremental cost.

Our outsourced management solutions agreements generally provide for fixed monthly management fees and, in most cases, fees payable for each transaction. The transaction fees under these agreements are generally lower than those under card acceptance agreements.

 

Euronet-Branded ATM Transaction Processing

 

Our Euronet-branded ATM networks, also known as IAD networks, are primarily managed by a processing center that uses our internally developed software solutions. The ATMs in our IAD networks are able to process transactions for holders of credit and debit cards issued by or bearing the logos of financial institutions and international card organizations such as American Express®, Visa®, Mastercard®, Diners Club International®, Discover® and UnionPay International©, as well as international ATM networks such as PULSE®. This is accomplished through our agreements and relationships with these institutions, international credit and debit card issuers and international card associations.

4


When a bank cardholder conducts a transaction on a Euronet-owned ATM or automated deposit terminal, we receive a fee from the cardholder's bank for that transaction. The bank pays us this fee either directly or indirectly through a central switching and settlement network. When paid indirectly, this fee is referred to as the "interchange fee." All of the banks in a shared ATM and POS switching system establish the amount of the interchange fee by agreement. We receive transaction processing fees for successful transactions and, in certain circumstances, for transactions that are not completed because they fail to receive authorization. The fees paid to us by the card issuers are independent of any fees charged by the card issuers to cardholders in connection with the ATM transactions. In some cases, we may also charge a direct access fee or surcharge to cardholders at the ATM. The direct access fee is added to the amount of the cash withdrawal and debited from the cardholder's account.

We generally receive fees or earn margin from our customers for six types of ATM transactions:

  • Cash withdrawals;
  • Cash deposits;
  • Balance inquiries;
  • Transactions not completed because the relevant card issuer does not give authorization;
  • Dynamic currency conversion; and
  • Prepaid telecommunication recharges and other electronic content.

Card Acceptance or Sponsorship Agreements

 

Our agreements with financial institutions and international card organizations generally provide that all credit and debit cards issued by the financial institution or organization may be used at all ATMs that we operate in a given market. In most markets, we operate under sponsorship by our own e-money licensed entities. In some markets, we have agreements with a financial institution under which we are designated as a service provider (which we refer to as "sponsorship agreements") for the acceptance of domestic cards and/or cards bearing international logos, such as Visa® and Mastercard®. These card acceptance or sponsorship agreements allow us to receive transaction authorization directly from the card issuing institution or international card organizations on a stand-in basis. Our agreements generally provide for a term of three to seven years and renew automatically unless either party provides notice of non-renewal prior to the termination date. In some cases, the agreements are terminable by either party upon six months' notice. We are generally able to connect a financial institution to our network within 30 to 90 days of signing a card acceptance agreement. The financial institution provides the cash needed to complete transactions on the ATM, but we provide a significant portion of the cash to our IAD network to fund ATM transactions ourselves. Euronet is generally liable for the cash in the ATM networks.

Under our card acceptance agreements, the ATM transaction fees we charge vary depending on the type of transaction and the number of transactions attributable to a particular card issuer. Our agreements generally provide for payment in local currency, though transaction fees are sometimes denominated in euros or U.S. dollars. Transaction fees are billed to financial institutions and card organizations with payment terms typically no longer than one month.

Dynamic Currency Conversion

 

We offer dynamic currency conversion, or DCC, over our IAD networks, ATM networks that we operate on an outsourced basis for financial institutions, and over financial institutions' ATM networks or POS devices as a stand-alone service. DCC is a feature of the underlying ATM or POS transaction that is offered to customers completing transactions using a foreign debit or credit card issued in a country with a currency other than the currency where the ATM or POS is located. The customer is offered a choice between completing the transaction in the local currency or in the customer's home currency via a DCC transaction. If a cardholder chooses to perform a DCC transaction, the acquirer or processor performs the foreign exchange conversion at the time that the funds are delivered at an ATM or the transactions are completed through the POS terminal, which results in a pre-defined amount of the customer's home currency being charged to their card. Alternatively, the customer may have the transaction converted by the card issuing bank, in which the amount of local currency is communicated to the card issuing bank and the card issuing bank makes the conversion to the customer's home currency.

5


When a customer chooses DCC at an ATM or POS device and Euronet acts as the acquirer or processor, we receive all or a portion of the foreign exchange margin on the conversion of the transaction. On our IAD ATMs, Euronet receives the entire foreign exchange margin. If Euronet is not the acquirer or processor of the transaction, we share the DCC revenue with the sponsor bank. On ATMs or POS devices that are operated for financial institutions, or where we offer DCC as a stand-alone service to financial institutions or merchants, we share the foreign exchange margin. The foreign exchange margin on a DCC transaction increases the amount Euronet earns from the underlying ATM or POS transaction and supports deployment of additional ATMs in new locations.


Other Products and Services

 

Our network of owned or operated ATMs allows for the sale of additional financial and other products or services at a low incremental cost. We have developed value added services in addition to basic cash withdrawal and balance inquiry transactions. These value added services include mobile top-up, fraud management, bill payment, domestic and international surcharge, CRM, foreign remittance payout, cardless payout, banknote recycling, electronic content, ticket and voucher, and advertising. We are committed to the ongoing development of innovative new products and services to offer our EFT processing customers. 

 

Euronet offers multinational merchants a Single European Payments Area ("SEPA")-compliant cross-border transaction processing solution. SEPA is an area in which all electronic payments can be made and received in euros, whether between or within national boundaries, under the same basic conditions, rights and obligations, regardless of the location. This single, centralized acquiring platform enables merchants to benefit from cost savings and faster, more efficient payments transfer. Although many European countries are not members of the eurozone, our platform can serve merchants in these countries as well, through our multi-currency functionality.

 

Software Solutions

 

We also offer a suite of integrated software solutions for electronic payments and transaction delivery systems. We generate revenues for our software products from licensing, professional services and maintenance fees for software and sales of related hardware, primarily to financial institutions around the world. 


Our software products are an integral part of the EFT Processing Segment product lines, and our investment in research, development, delivery and customer support reflects our ongoing commitment to an expanded customer base both internally and externally. Our proprietary software is used by our processing centers in the EFT Processing Segment, resulting in cost savings and added value compared to third-party license and maintenance options. Our proprietary software consists of our legacy ITM software, which we have used and sold to financial institutions since 1998 through our Software Solutions unit, and an innovative switching software package named REN that we released in 2017.

We currently operate REN in our processing center to process payments for our own networks in Europe and we are progressively transitioning all our networks globally to REN. The private cloud architecture of REN allows us to simultaneously deploy REN across multiple physical locations. REN is now operated for both internal resources and external customers with the launch of the REN Foundation for Mozambique's National Payments Network in 2020. REN is scalable and will allow us to offer payment and digital solutions to more third parties. In addition to payments processing, REN also supports other digital elements, including card issuing for physical and virtual cards, loyalty services, Know Your Customer compliance, real time settlement, inventory management, risk and fraud management and other services. REN will be used as a platform to connect Euronet assets to offer digital payment solutions, and is currently utilized within the epay and Money Transfer Segments.

EFT Processing Segment Strategy

The EFT Processing Segment maintains a strategy to expand the network of ATMs and POS terminals into developed and developing markets that have the greatest potential for growth. In addition, we follow a supporting strategy to increase the penetration of value added (or complementary) services across our existing customer base, including DCC, surcharge, cardless payment, banknote recycling solutions, tax refund services, advertising, fraud management, bill payment, mobile top-up, CRM and foreign remittance payout.

6


We continually strive to make our own ATM networks more efficient by eliminating underperforming ATMs and installing ATMs in more desirable locations. We make selective additions to our own ATM network if we see market demand and profit opportunities. In tourist locations, we also shut down ATMs during the winter season when tourist activity is low.

In recent years, the need for "all-in" services has increased. Banks, particularly smaller banks, are increasingly looking for integrated ATM, POS and card issuing processing and management services. Euronet is well positioned for this opportunity as it can offer a full end-to-end solution to the potential partners.

Additional growth opportunities are driven through financial institutions that are receptive to outsourcing the operation of their ATM, POS and card networks. The operation of these devices requires expensive hardware and software and specialized personnel. These resources are available to us, and we offer them to our customers under outsourcing contracts. The expansion and enhancement of our outsourced management solutions in new and existing markets will remain an important business opportunity for Euronet. Increasing the number of non-owned ATMs and POS terminals that we operate under management services agreements and continued development of our credit and debit card outsourcing business could provide continued growth while minimizing our capital investment.

 

Complementary services offered by our epay Segment, where we provide prepaid mobile top-up services through POS terminals, strengthens the EFT Processing Segment's line of services. We plan to continue to expand our technology and business methods into other markets where we operate and further leverage our relationships with mobile phone operators and financial institutions to facilitate that expansion.

Seasonality

Our EFT Processing business experiences its heaviest demand for cash withdrawals and DCC during the third quarter of the fiscal year, coinciding with the tourism season. It is also impacted by seasonality during the fourth quarter and first quarter of each year due to higher transaction levels during the holiday season and lower levels after the holiday season. This seasonality is increased due to our practice of seasonally deactivating ATMs in tourist locations that experience significantly higher traffic during the summer. Seasonally deactivating involves shutting down the ATMs during the slower months and results in lower overall transaction volumes in the EFT Processing Segment during those months. As we have expanded our IAD network in tourist locations, the financial impact of seasonally deactivating has increased, because we continue to bear the expense of seasonally deactivated ATMs even though they do not generate transactions during the slower months.

Significant Customers and Government Contracts

No individual customer of the EFT Processing Segment makes up greater than 10% of total consolidated revenues. In India, we have contracts with government-owned banks to provide certain ATM driving and transaction switching services and mobile airtime recharge services. Additionally, certain government-owned banks are members of our shared ATM network in India and we provide software services to financial institutions partially owned by government-owned banks. In Austria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Egypt, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Malta, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Spain, and the United Kingdom, we lease land and other property for certain ATM sites from companies that are majority-owned by the government. In Pakistan, we have a contract with a government-owned bank to provide software support services. In China and Greece, we have contracts with clients and financial institutions that are partially owned by the government.

Competition

 

Our principal EFT Processing Segment competitors include ATM networks owned by financial institutions and national switches consisting of consortiums of local banks that provide outsourcing and transaction services to financial institutions and independent ATM deployers in a particular country. Additionally, large, well-financed companies that operate ATMs offer ATM network and outsourcing services, and those that provide card outsourcing, POS processing and merchant acquiring services also compete with us in various markets. Small local operators have also recently begun offering their services, particularly in the IAD market. None of these competitors has a dominant market share in any of our markets. Competitive advantages in our EFT Processing Segment include breadth of service offering, network availability and response time, price to both the financial institution and to its customers, ATM location and access to other networks.

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epay Segment

 

Overview

 

We currently offer prepaid mobile airtime top-up services and other electronic content and payment processing services for various prepaid products, cards and services on a network of approximately 748,000 POS terminals across approximately 338,000 retailer locations in Europe, the Middle East, Asia Pacific, the United States and South America. Our processing centers for the epay Segment are located in the U.K., Germany, Italy, and the U.S.

 

Since 2003, we have expanded our prepaid business in new and existing markets by drawing upon our depth of experience to build and expand relationships with content providers, mobile phone operators and retailers. We offer a wide range of products across our retail networks, including prepaid mobile airtime, prepaid debit cards, prepaid gift cards, prepaid electronic content such as music, games and software, prepaid vouchers, transport payments, lottery payments, prepaid long distance and bill payment processing assistance through partnerships with various licensed money transmitters.

Sources of Revenues

The epay Segment generates commissions and processing fees from the distribution of electronic content and from telecommunications service providers for the sale and distribution of prepaid mobile airtime. In 2020, approximately 65% of total revenues and approximately 71% of gross profit for the epay Segment was from electronic content other than prepaid mobile airtime (digital media products).

Customers purchase digital media prepaid content as a gift or for self-use. Content is generally purchased in two ways: (1) directly online from the content provider using an online payment method, or (2) through physical retail stores, online retailers or other electronic channels, including payment wallets, online banking, mobile applications and other sources.

C
ustomers using mobile phones generally pay for usage in one of two ways: (1) through "postpaid" accounts, where usage is billed at the end of each billing period, or (2) through "prepaid" accounts, where customers pay in advance by crediting their accounts prior to usage.


Although mobile phone operators in the U.S. and certain European countries have provided service principally through postpaid accounts, the norm in many other countries in Europe and the rest of the world is to offer wireless service on a prepaid basis.

 

Prepaid mobile phone credits are generally distributed using personal identification numbers ("PINs"). We distribute PINs in two ways. First, we establish an electronic connection to the mobile operator and the retailer. When the sale to a customer is initiated, the terminal requests the PIN from the mobile operator via our transaction processing platform. These transactions obtain the PIN directly from the mobile operator. The customer pays the retailer and the retailer becomes obligated to make settlement to us of the purchased amount of the mobile airtime. We maintain systems that know the amount of mobile top-up sold by the retailer which allows us in turn to bill that retailer for the mobile top-up sold.

Second, we purchase PINs from the mobile operator which are electronically sent to our processing platform. We establish an electronic connection with the POS terminals in retailer locations and our processing platform provides the terminal with a PIN when the mobile top-up is purchased. We maintain systems that monitor transaction levels at each terminal. As sales of prepaid mobile airtime to customers are completed, the inventory on the platform is reduced by the PIN purchased. The customer payment and settlement with the retailer are the same as described above.

 

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We expand our distribution networks by signing new contracts with retailers, and in some markets, by acquiring existing networks. We continue to focus on growing our distribution network through independent sales organizations that contract directly with retailers in their network to distribute prepaid mobile airtime or other digital media content from the retailers' POS terminals. We continue to increase our focus on direct relationships with chains of supermarkets, convenience stores, gas stations, and other larger scale retailers, where we can negotiate multi-year agreements with the retailers. In addition to the sale of traditional mobile top-up volume described above, we have expanded distribution into digital media products and other value-added services. We have leveraged our existing technology infrastructure to sell digital media products, which have been sold through our traditional retailer network and new retailer networks such as electronic channels. In the U.S., most prepaid digital media content is purchased for gifting; in markets outside the U.S., consumers generally purchase prepaid digital media content for self-use.

epay Products and Services

Prepaid Mobile Airtime Transaction Processing

 

We process prepaid mobile airtime top-up transactions on our international POS network for two types of clients: distributors and retailers. Both types of client transactions start with a consumer in a retail store. The retailer uses a specially programmed POS terminal in the store, the retailer's electronic cash register (ECR) system, or web-based POS device that is connected to our network to buy prepaid mobile airtime. The consumer will select a predefined amount of mobile airtime from the carrier of choice, and the retailer enters the selection into the POS terminal. The consumer will pay that amount to the retailer (in cash or other payment methods accepted by the retailer). The POS device then transmits the selected transaction to our processing center. Using the electronic connection we maintain with the mobile phone operator or drawing from our inventory of PINs, the purchased amount of mobile airtime will be either credited to the consumer's account or delivered via a PIN printed by the terminal and given to the consumer. In the case of PINs printed by the terminal, the consumer must then call the mobile phone operator's toll-free number to activate the purchased airtime to the consumer's mobile account.

 

One difference in our relationships with various retailers and distributors is the way in which we charge for our services. For distributors and certain very large retailers, we charge a processing fee. However, the majority of our transactions occur with smaller retailers. With these clients, we receive a commission or discount on each transaction that is withheld from the payments made to the mobile phone operator, and we share that commission/discount with the retailers.

Closed Loop Gift Cards

 

Closed loop (private-branded) gift cards are generally described as merchant-specific prepaid cards, used for purchases exclusively at a particular merchant's locations. We distribute closed loop gift cards in various categories, including dining, retail, and digital media, such as music, games and software. Generally, the gift card is activated when a consumer loads funds (with cash, debit or credit card payment) or purchases a preloaded value gift card at a retail store location or online.

 

Open Loop Gift Cards

 

Open loop (network-branded) gift cards are prepaid gift cards associated with an electronic payment network (such as Visa® or Mastercard®) and are honored at multiple, unaffiliated locations (wherever cards from these networks are generally accepted). They are not merchant-specific. We distribute and issue single-use, non-reloadable open loop gift cards carrying the Visa® brand in our retail channels. After the consumer purchases the preloaded value gift card at a retail store location or online, the consumer must call the toll-free number on the back of the card to activate it.

 

Open Loop Reloadable

 

We distribute Visa® and Mastercard® issued debit cards provided by Green Dot, NetSpend and other card issuers. We also manage and distribute a proprietary debit card that allows a retailer to issue its own reloadable store-branded card. Open loop reloadable cards have features similar to a bank checking account, including direct deposit, purchasing capability wherever a credit card is accepted, bill payment and ATM access. Fees are charged to consumers for the initial load and reload transactions, monthly account maintenance and other transactions.

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Other Products and Services

 

Our POS network is used for the distribution of other products and services, including games and software, bill payment, lottery tickets and transportation products. Through our Cadooz subsidiary, we also distribute vouchers and physical gifts into the business-to-business ("B2B") channel principally for the purposes of employee and customer incentives and rewards. In certain locations, the terminals used for prepaid services can also be used for electronic funds transfer to process credit and debit card payments for retail merchandise. We provide promotion and advertising for content providers of their prepaid content throughout our retail distribution network. We also provide card production and processing services to some of our prepaid gift card partners and telecom content providers.

Retailer and Distributor Contracts

 

We provide our prepaid services through POS terminals or web-based POS devices installed in retail outlets or, in the case of major retailers, through direct connections between their ECR systems and our processing centers. In markets where we operate proprietary technology (the U.K., Germany, Australia, Poland, Ireland, New Zealand, Spain, Greece, India, Italy, Brazil and the U.S.), we generally own and maintain the POS terminals. In certain countries in Europe, the terminals are sold to the retailers or to distributors who service the retailer. Our agreements with major retailers for the POS services typically have one to three-year terms. These agreements include terms regarding the connection of our networks to the respective retailer's registers or payment terminals or the maintenance of POS terminals, and obligations concerning settlement and liability for transactions processed. Generally, our agreements with individual or small retailers have shorter terms and provide that either party can terminate the agreement upon three to six months' notice.

 

In Germany, distributors are key intermediaries in the sale of mobile top-up. As a result, our business in Germany is substantially concentrated in, and dependent upon, relationships with our major distributors. The termination of any of our agreements with major distributors could materially and adversely affect our prepaid business in Germany. However, we have been establishing agreements with independent German retailers in order to diversify our exposure to such distributors.


The number of transactions processed on our POS networks has increased over the last five years at a compound annual growth rate ("CAGR") of approximately 13.1% as indicated in the following table:

 

 

 

 

 

 

(in millions)

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

epay processing transactions per year

1,294

1,186

1,149

1,542

2,395

 

The loss of a high-volume, low-margin customer in the Middle East in 2017 contributed to a decline in processing transactions in 2017 and 2018. The addition of a high-volume, low-margin market in India contributed to an overall increase in processing transactions in 2020.

 

epay Segment Strategy

 

Mobile top-up transactions are declining in many developed markets and transaction fees for mobile transactions are being compressed by the mobile operators. epay's strategy is to defend margins in developing markets by providing value added services to mobile operators and to decrease our reliance on mobile top-up by increasing distribution of other electronic content. New product initiatives focus on products such as gift card malls, prepaid debit cards, transport and electronic content, including music, software and games. Strategic execution behind new products includes the development of relationships with global consumer product brands. This strategy leverages the global scale of the epay business allowing global brands to be sold in many or all of the countries in which we have a presence. Examples of global brands we distribute include iTunes, Google Play, Sony, and Microsoft.

Telecommunications companies and other content providers have a substantial opportunity to increase revenues by diversifying the products and services currently offered to their retailers. epay is deploying additional content through its POS network to retailers and distributors all over the world. The reach, capabilities and quality of the epay network are appealing as a global distribution channel. We are one of the largest worldwide multi-country operators, and believe we have a distinct competitive advantage from the existing relationships that we maintain with prepaid content providers and retailers.

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Seasonality

 

As the product mix continues to change, the epay business is impacted by seasonality during the fourth quarter and first quarter of each year due to the higher transaction levels during the holiday season and lower levels following the holiday season.

 

Significant Customers and Government Contracts


No individual customer of our epay Segment makes up greater than 10% of total consolidated revenues. epay has a contract for the technology and distribution infrastructure for six state-owned lotteries in Germany. In addition, epay has contracts with Transurban Limited, the largest manager of toll road networks in Australia, Cubic supporting New South Wales Transport ticketing in Australia and with New Zealand Transport Authority, which operates all toll roads in New Zealand. In Germany, Cadooz has a contract with Deutsche Bahn, which is majority owned by the German state. We also have a contract for the processing of mobile airtime with a Saudi company, which is majority owned by the Saudi government. There are no other government contracts in the epay Segment.

 

Competition

 

We face competition in the prepaid business in all of our markets. We compete with a few multinational companies that operate in several of our markets. In other markets, our competition is from smaller, local companies. The mobile operators in all of our markets have retail distribution networks, and in some markets, on-line distribution of their own through which they offer top-up services for their own products.

 

We believe our size and market share are competitive advantages in many markets. In addition, we believe our processing platforms are a competitive advantage. We have extremely flexible technical platforms that enable us to tailor POS solutions to individual retailers and mobile operator and digital media content provider requirements where appropriate. Our platforms are also able to provide value added services other than processing which makes us a more valuable partner to the content providers and retailers. We have introduced new digital products into the marketplace such as digital payment for online media subscriptions. Many of these products are not offered by our competitors and in many countries, these are new products. We are capitalizing on being the first to market for these products.

 

The principal competitive factors in the epay Segment include price (that is, the level of commission paid to retailers for each transaction), breadth of products and up-time offered on the system. Major retailers with high volumes are able to demand a larger share of the commission, which increases the amount of competition among service providers. We are seeing signs that some mobile operators are expanding their distribution networks to provide top-up services on-line or via mobile devices, which provides other alternatives for consumers to use.

Money Transfer Segment

Overview

We provide global money transfer services primarily under the brand names Ria, IME, AFEX, and xe. Ria and IME provide consumer-to-consumer money transfer services through a global network of more than 464,000 locations and our websites riamoneytransfer.com and online.imeremit.com. Most of our money transfers are originated through sending agents in approximately 43 countries, with money transfer delivery completed in 159 countries. The initiation of a consumer money transfer occurs through retail agents, Company-owned stores or online, while the delivery of money transfers can occur with bank correspondents, retailer agents or from certain ATMs. Our websites allow consumers to send funds online, using a bank account or credit or debit card, for pay-out directly to a bank account or for cash pickup.

 

In addition, we provide global account-to-account money transfer services under the brand name xe. We offer money transfer services via our websites (www.xe.com and https://transferxe.com) and through customer service representatives. xe also provides foreign currency exchange information on its currency data websites (www.xe.com and www.x-rates.com). Through xe, we offer cash management solutions and foreign currency risk management services to small-and-medium sized businesses.

 

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We monitor the number of transactions made through our money transfer networks. The number of transactions processed on our network has increased over the last five years at a CAGR of approximately 7.2% as indicated in the following table:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(in millions)

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

Money transfer transactions per year

82.3

92.2

107.6

114.5

116.5

 

Our sending agent network includes a variety of agents, including Walmart, large/medium size regional retailers, convenience stores, bodegas, multi-service shops and phone centers, which are predominantly found in areas with a large immigrant population. Each Ria money transfer transaction is processed using Euronet's proprietary software system and checked for security, completeness and compliance with federal and state regulations at every step of the process. Senders can track the progress of their transfers through Ria's customer service representatives, and funds are delivered quickly to their beneficiaries via our extensive payout network, which includes large banks and non-bank financial institutions, post offices and large retailers. Our processing centers for the Money Transfer Segment are located in the U.S., the U.K., New Zealand, and Malaysia.

We are one of the largest global money transfer companies measured by revenues and transaction volumes. Our Money Transfer Segment processed approximately $54 billion in money transfers in 2020.


Sources of Revenues

 

Revenues in the Money Transfer Segment are derived through the charging of a transaction fee, as well as a margin earned from purchasing foreign currency at wholesale exchange rates and selling the foreign currency to customers at retail exchange rates. Sending agents and receiving agents for consumer-to-consumer products each earn fees for cash collection and distribution services. Euronet recognizes these fees as direct operating costs at the time of sale.


Money Transfer Products and Services

 

Money transfer products and services are sold primarily through three channels: at agent locations, Company-owned stores and on internet enabled devices at riamoneytransfer.com, online.imeremit.com, xe.com, and https://transferxe.com (online transactions). In an online transaction, customers send funds, using a bank account or credit or debit card, for pay-out at most of our agent locations around the world or directly to a bank account.


Through our TeleRia service, customers connect to our call center from a telephone available at an agent location and a representative collects the information over the telephone and enters it directly into our secure proprietary system. As soon as the data capture is complete, our central system automatically faxes a confirmation receipt to the agent location for the customer to review and sign and the customer pays the agent the money to be transferred, together with a fee. The agent then faxes the signed receipt back to Ria to complete the transaction.

Through our Walmart-2-Walmart Money Transfer Service, which allows customers to transfer money to and from Walmart stores in the U.S., our Ria business executes the transfers with Walmart serving as both the sending agent and payout correspondent. Ria earns a significantly lower margin from these transactions than its traditional money transfers; however, the arrangement adds a significant number of transactions to Ria's business. The agreement with Walmart establishes Ria as the only party through which Walmart will sell U.S. domestic money transfers branded with Walmart marks. The agreement is effective until April 2023. Thereafter, it will automatically renew for one year terms unless either party provides notice to the contrary. The agreement imposes certain obligations on each party, the most significant being service level requirements by Ria and money transfer compliance requirements by Walmart. Any violation of these requirements by Ria could result in an obligation to indemnify Walmart or termination of the contract by Walmart. However, the agreement allows the parties to resolve disputes by mutual agreement without termination of the agreement.

 

In addition to money transfers, Ria also offers customers bill payment services, payment alternatives such as money orders, comprehensive check cashing services for a wide variety of issued checks, along with competitive foreign currency exchange services and mobile top-up. These services are all offered through our Company-owned stores while select services are offered through our agents in certain markets.

 

Ria money orders are widely recognized and exchanged throughout the United States. Our check cashing services cover payroll and personal checks, cashier checks, tax refund checks, government checks, insurance drafts and money orders. Our bill payment services offer timely posting of customer bills for over 7,000 companies, including electric and gas utilities and telephone/wireless companies. Bill payment services are offered primarily in the U.S.

 

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xe offers account-to-account international payment service to high-income individuals and small-and-medium sized businesses, complementing our existing consumer-to-consumer money transfer business. xe has a multi-channel platform which allows customers to make transfers, track payments and manage their international payment activity online or through a customer service representative. xe offers cash management solutions and foreign currency risk management services to small-and-medium sized businesses. xe also offers foreign currency exchange subscriptions and advertising on its websites.


Money Transfer Segment Strategy

 

The Money Transfer Segment's strategy is to increase the volume of money transfers processed by leveraging our existing banking and merchant/retailer relationships to expand our agent and correspondent networks in existing corridors. In addition, we pursue expansion into high-potential money transfer corridors from the U.S. and internationally beyond the traditional U.S. to Mexico corridor. Further, we expect to continue to take advantage of cross-selling opportunities with our epay and EFT Processing Segments by providing prepaid services through our stores and agents and offering our money transfer services at select prepaid retail locations and ATMs we operate in key markets. We will continue to make investments in our systems to support this growth. Additionally, we are expanding our xe business into new markets.

 

Seasonality

 

Our money transfer business is significantly impacted by seasonality that varies by region. In most of our markets, we experience increased money transfer transaction levels during the month of May and in the fourth quarter of each year, coinciding with various holidays. Additionally, in the U.S. to Mexico corridor, we usually experience our heaviest volume during the May through October time frame, coinciding with the increase in worker migration patterns and various holidays, and our lowest volumes during the first quarter.

 

Significant Customers and Government Contracts

 

No individual customer of our Money Transfer Segment makes up greater than 10% of total consolidated revenues. The Money Transfer Segment maintains correspondent relationships with a number of financial institutions whose ownership includes governments of the correspondents' countries of origin. Those countries include Armenia, Austria, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belgium, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, China, Costa Rica, Cote d'Ivoire, Cuba, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea - Bissau, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Liberia, Madagascar, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Moldova, Morocco, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Philippines, Poland, Romania, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Senegal, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Tanzania, Thailand, Togo, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Vietnam, Yemen, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.

Competition

 

Our primary competitors in the money transfer and bill payment business include other large money transfer companies and electronic money transmitters, together with hundreds of smaller registered and unregistered money transmitters, as well as certain major national and regional banks, financial institutions and independent sales organizations. Our competition includes The Western Union Company, the leading competitor with revenue approximately two times greater than our revenue. The Western Union Company has a significant competitive advantage due to its greater resources and access to capital for expansion. This may allow them to offer better pricing terms to customers, agents or correspondents, which may result in a loss of our current or potential customers or could force us to lower our prices. In addition to traditional money payment services, new technologies are emerging that compete with traditional money payment services, such as stored-value cards, debit networks, web-based services and digital currencies. Our continued growth also depends upon our ability to compete effectively with these alternative technologies.

 

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Employees

 

We had approximately 8,100, 7,700 and 7,100 employees as of December 31, 2020, 2019, and 2018, respectively. We believe our future success will depend in part on our ability to continue to recruit, retain and motivate qualified management, technical and administrative employees. Currently, no union represents any of our employees, except in one of our Spanish subsidiaries. We experienced no work stoppages or strikes by our workforce in 2020 and we consider relations with our employees to be good.

Government Regulation

 

As discussed below, many of our business activities are subject to regulation in our current markets. In the Money Transfer Segment, we are subject to a wide variety of laws and regulations of the U.S., individual U.S. states and foreign governments. These include international, federal and state anti-money laundering and sanctions laws and regulations, money transfer and payment instrument licensing laws, escheat laws, laws covering consumer privacy, data protection and information security and consumer disclosure and consumer protection laws. Our operations have also been subject to increasingly strict requirements intended to help prevent and detect a variety of illegal financial activity, including money laundering, terrorist financing, unauthorized access to personal customer data and other illegal activities. The more significant of these laws and regulations are discussed below. Noncompliance with these laws and requirements could result in the loss or suspension of licenses or registrations required to provide money transfer services through retail agents, Company owned stores or online. For more discussion, see Item 1A - Risk Factors. 

 

Any further expansion of our activity into areas that are qualified as "financial activity" under local legislation may subject us to licensing and we may be required to comply with various conditions to obtain such licenses. Moreover, the interpretations of bank regulatory authorities as to the activity we currently conduct might change in the future. We monitor our business for compliance with applicable laws or regulations regarding financial activities.

  

Certain of our European product offerings, including in particular, our money transfer services, merchant acquiring and bill payment products, are regulated payment services requiring a license under the Second Payment Services Directive, or PSD2, which replaced the Payment Services Directive, or PSD, effective January 13, 2018. Key changes made by PSD2 include: creation of two new payment service types, extension of PSD rules on transparency to additional transactions not previously covered by PSD; enhanced cooperation and information exchange between authorities in the context of authorization and supervision of payment institutions and electronic money institutions; and increased obligations around the management of operational and security risk and the notification of incidents, increased obligations relating to complaints handling and additional requirements regarding payment security.  PSD2 as implemented in some member states also resulted in some of our European licensed institutions needing to go through a re-authorisation process. 

 

PSD2 requires a license to perform certain defined "payment services" in a European Economic Area (“EEA”) Member State and such license may be extended throughout other Member States of the EEA through passporting of the license (either on a freedom of service or freedom of establishment basis). Conditions for obtaining the license include minimum capital requirements, establishment of procedures for safeguarding of funds, and certain governance and reporting requirements. In addition, certain obligations relating to internal controls and the conduct of business, in particular, consumer disclosure requirements and certain rules regarding the timing and settlement of payments, must be met. We have payment institution licenses in the U.K., France, Germany, and Spain and are complying with these requirements. Traditionally, we passported our U.K., German and Spanish payment services authorizations to several Member States. As a result of Brexit, our U.K, payment institution is no longer capable of passporting its license in to the EEA and the relevant EEA business was transferred to our other licenses prior to the end of the Brexit transition period. Additionally, in the U.K., we have obtained an e-money license. The e-money license allows Euronet to issue e-money and provide the same payment services as a PSD2 licensee.  The e-money license imposes certain requirements similar to those of the payment services license, including minimum capital requirements, consumer disclosure and internal controls. Prior to the end of the Brexit transition period, our e-money license was passported into over twenty-five EEA Member States. As a result of Brexit, we have restructured the regulated services provided by our U.K. e-money institution in the EEA Member States and transitioned them to our other payment service licenses that can still operate in the EEA. The e-money institution will continue to operate in the U.K. unchanged.

 

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Money Transfer and Payment Instrument Licensing

 

Licensing requirements in the U.S. are generally driven by the various state banking departments regulating the businesses of money transfers and issuances of payment instruments. Typical requirements include the meeting of minimum net worth requirements, maintaining permissible investments (e.g., cash, agent receivables, and government-backed securities) at levels commensurate with outstanding payment obligations and the filing of a security instrument (typically in the form of a surety bond) to offset the risk of default of trustee obligations by the license holder. We are required by many state regulators to submit ongoing reports of licensed activity, most often on a quarterly or monthly basis, that address changes to agent and branch locations, operating and financial performance, permissible investments and outstanding transmission liabilities. These periodic reports are utilized by the regulator to monitor ongoing compliance with state licensing laws. A number of major state regulators also conduct periodic examinations of license holders and their authorized delegates, generally with a frequency of every one to two years. Examinations are most often comprehensive in nature, addressing both the safety and soundness and overall compliance by the license holder with regard to state and federal regulations. Such examinations are typically performed on-site at the license holder's headquarters or operations center; however, certain states may choose to perform examinations off-site as well.

Money transmitters, issuers of payment instruments and their agents are required to comply with U.S. federal, state and/or foreign anti-money laundering laws and regulations. In summary, our Money Transfer Segment, as well as our agent network, is subject to regulations issued by the different state and foreign national regulators who license us, the Office of Foreign Assets Control ("OFAC"), the Bank Secrecy Act as amended by the USA PATRIOT ("BSA"), the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network ("FINCEN"), as well as any existing or future regulations that impact any aspect of our money transfer business.

A similar set of regulations applies to our money transfer businesses in most of the foreign countries in which we originate transactions. These laws and regulations include monetary limits for money transfers into or out of a country, rules regarding the foreign currency exchange rates offered, as well as other limitations or rules for which we must maintain compliance.


Regulatory bodies in the U.S. and abroad may impose additional rules on the conduct of our Money Transfer Segment that could have a significant impact on our operations and our agent network. In this regard, the U.S. federal government has implemented U.S. federal regulations for electronic money transfers, including the Electronic Fund Transfer Act, which provides consumer protections for international remittance transfers. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau ("CFPB"), adopted a rule that provides additional protections for consumers who transmit money internationally, including disclosure requirements, cancellation rights and error resolution procedures for consumer complaints. Under U.S. federal law, it is unlawful for any provider of consumer financial products or services to engage in unfair, deceptive or abusive acts or practices (collectively, "UDAAPs"). The CFPB has rule making and enforcement authority to prevent UDAAPs in connection with transactions for consumer financial products or services. The CFPB audits our compliance with these rules, and we may be subject to fines or penalties for violations of any of such rules.

 

Escheat Regulations

 

Our Money Transfer Segment is subject to the unclaimed or abandoned property (i.e., "escheat") regulations of the United States and certain foreign countries in which we operate. These laws require us to turn over property held by Euronet on behalf of others remaining unclaimed after specified periods of time (i.e., "dormancy" or "escheat" periods). Such abandoned property is generally attributable to the failure of beneficiary parties to claim money transfers or the failure to negotiate money orders, a form of payment instrument. We have policies and programs in place to help us monitor the required information relating to each money transfer or payment instrument for possible eventual reporting to the jurisdiction from which the order was originally received. In the U.S., reporting of unclaimed property by money service companies is performed annually, generally with a due date of on or before November 1. State banking department regulators will typically include a review of Euronet escheat procedures and related filings as part of their examination protocol.

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Privacy and Information Security Regulations

Our operations involve the collection and storage of certain types of personal customer data that are subject to privacy and security laws in the U.S. and abroad. In the United States, we are subject to the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act ("GLBA") and various state laws including California Consumer Privacy Act ("CCPA"), which requires that financial institutions have in place policies regarding the collection, processing, storage and disclosure of information considered nonpublic personal information. Laws in other countries include the E.U.'s General Data Protection Regulation (2016/679) ("GDPR"), which became effective from May 25, 2018, as well as the laws of other countries.

The GDPR establishes stringent requirements for the collection and processing of personal information of individuals within the E.U. The GDPR establishes certain rights of individuals regarding personal information processed by companies as well as requirements for information security, and imposes significant fines that may be revenue-based for violation of its requirements. Any failure on our part to meet the requirements of the GDPR could result in the imposition of fines and penalties that could affect our financial results.

We comply with the GLBA and state privacy provisions. In July 2020, the European Court of Justice invalidated the EU-US Privacy Shield as a lawful mechanism for transferring personal data to the US as a result of concerns related to surveillance by law enforcement agencies and a lack of judicial redress by individuals in the EU (known as the "Schrems II" decision). Despite the July 2020 ruling of the European Court of Justice, we believe we remain in compliance with E.U. regulations regarding the transfer of personal data to the United States and other jurisdictions.

Recently, as identity theft has been on the rise, there has been increased public attention to concerns about information security and consumer privacy, accompanied by laws and regulations addressing the issue. We believe we are compliant with these laws and regulations; however, this is a rapidly evolving area and there can be no assurance that we will continue to meet the existing and new regulations, which could have a material, adverse impact on our Money Transfer Segment business.

Anti-corruption and Bribery

We are subject to the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act ("FCPA"), which prohibits U.S. and other business entities from making improper payments to foreign government officials, political parties or political party officials. We are also subject to the applicable anti-corruption laws in the jurisdictions in which we operate, such as the U.K. Bribery Act, thus potentially exposing us to liability and potential penalties in multiple jurisdictions. The anti-corruption provisions of the FCPA are enforced by the United States Department of Justice. In addition, the Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC") requires strict compliance with certain accounting and internal control standards set forth under the FCPA. Because our services are offered in many countries throughout the world, we face a higher risk associated with FCPA, the U.K. Bribery Act and other similar laws than many other companies and we have policies and procedures in place to address compliance with the FCPA, the U.K. Bribery Act and other similar laws. Any determination that we have violated these laws could have an adverse effect on our business, financial position and results of operations. Failure to comply with our policies and procedures or the FCPA and other laws can expose Euronet and/or individual employees to potentially severe criminal and civil penalties. Such penalties could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.


Sanctions Compliance


In addition to anti-money laundering laws and regulations, our products and services are subject to economic and trade sanctions laws and regulations promulgated by OFAC and other jurisdictions in which our products and services are offered.  The sanctions laws and regulations prohibit or restrict transactions to or from (or dealings with or involving) certain countries, regions, governments, and in certain circumstances, specified foreign nationals, as well as with certain individuals and entities such as narcotics traffickers, terrorists, and terrorist organizations. These sanctions laws and regulations require screening of transactions against government watch-lists, including but not limited to, the watch-lists maintained by OFAC, and include transactional and other reporting to government agencies.


Compliance Policies and Programs

 

We have developed risk-based policies and programs to comply with existing and new laws, regulations and other requirements outlined above, including having dedicated compliance personnel, training programs, automated monitoring systems and support functions for our offices and agents. To assist in managing and monitoring our money laundering and terrorist financing risks, we continue to have our compliance programs, in many countries, independently examined on an annual basis. In addition, we continue to enhance our anti-money laundering and counter-terrorist financing compliance policy, procedures and monitoring systems, as well as our consumer protection policies and procedures.

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Intellectual Property

 

Each of our three operating segments utilizes intellectual property which is protected in varying degrees by a combination of trademark, patent and copyright laws, as well as trade secret protection, license and confidentiality agreements.

 

The brand names of "Ria," "Ria Financial Services," "Ria Envia," "xe," "AFEX," "IME," derivations of those brand names and certain other brand names are material to our Money Transfer Segment and are registered trademarks and/or service marks in most of the markets in which our Money Transfer Segment operates. Consumer perception of these brand names is important to the growth prospects of our money transfer business. We also hold a U.S. patent on a card-based money transfer and bill payment system that allows transactions to be initiated primarily through POS terminals and integrated cash register systems.

 

With respect to our EFT Processing Segment, we have registered or applied for registration of our trademarks, including the names "Euronet" and "Bankomat" and/or our blue diamond logo, as well as other trade names in most markets in which these trademarks are used. Certain trademark authorities have notified us that they consider these trademarks to be generic and, therefore, not protected by trademark laws. This determination does not affect our ability to use the Euronet trademark in those markets, but it would prevent us from stopping other parties from using it in competition with Euronet. We have registered the "Euronet" trademark in the class of ATM machines in Germany, the U.K. and certain other Western European countries. We have filed pending applications and/or obtained patents for a number of our new software products and our processing technology, including certain top-up services and DCC services.

 

With respect to our epay Segment, we maintain registered trademarks for the "epay" brand and logo in the U.S., U.K., E.U. (through a Community Trademark application, which provides enforceability of the epay trademark in all member states of the European Union), Brazil, Australia and New Zealand. We have filed trademark applications for the “epay” brand in India and Singapore.  The trademark applications in both countries are still pending.

Additionally, we have filed a trademark application for the “epay” brand with the Madrid Protocol, which, if granted, will simplify the process to extending the international protection of the epay trademark.  We cannot be certain that we are entitled to use the epay trademark in any markets other than those in which we have registered the trademark; however, before entering new markets, we conduct searches to understand our usage rights.  We have filed patent applications for certain POS top-up and other epay technology. Certain patents have been granted while others have been refused or are still pending. We also hold a patent license covering certain of epay's operations in the U.S.

 

Technology in the areas in which we operate is developing very rapidly, and we are aware that many other companies have filed patent applications for products, processes and services similar to those we provide. The procedures of the U.S. patent office make it difficult for us to predict whether our patent applications will be approved or will be granted priority dates that are earlier than other patents that have been filed for similar products or services. Moreover, many "process patents" have been filed in the U.S. over recent years covering processes that are in wide use in the money transfer, EFT and prepaid processing industries. If any of these patents are considered to cover technology that has been incorporated into our systems, we may be required to obtain additional licenses and pay royalties to the holders of such patents to continue to use the affected technology or be prohibited from continuing the offering of such services if licenses are not obtained. This could materially and adversely affect our business.

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Information about our Executive Officers

 

The name, age, period of service and position held by each of our Executive Officers as of February 19, 2021 are as follows:

 

 

 

 

Name

Age

Served Since

Position Held

Michael J. Brown

64

July 1994

Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and President

Rick L. Weller

63

November 2002

Executive Vice President - Chief Financial Officer

Scott D. Claassen

54

May 2020

General Counsel and Secretary

Kevin J. Caponecchi

54

July 2007

Executive Vice President - Chief Executive Officer, epay, Software and EFT Asia Pacific Division

Juan C. Bianchi

50

April 2007

Executive Vice President - Chief Executive Officer, Money Transfer Segment

Nikos Fountas

57

September 2009

Executive Vice President - Chief Executive Officer, EFT Europe, Middle East and Africa Division

Martin L. Bruckner

45

January 2014

Senior Vice President - Chief Technology Officer

 

MICHAEL J. BROWN, Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and President. Mr. Brown is one of the founders of Euronet and has served as our Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer since 1996, and has served as President since December 2014. He also co-founded our predecessor company in 1994. Mr. Brown has been a Director of Euronet since our incorporation in December 1996 and previously served on the boards of Euronet's predecessor companies. In 1979, Mr. Brown founded Innovative Software, Inc., a computer software company that was merged in 1988 with Informix. Mr. Brown served as President and Chief Operating Officer of Informix from February 1988 to January 1989. He served as President of the Workstation Products Division of Informix from January 1989 until April 1990. In 1993, Mr. Brown was a founding investor of Visual Tools, Inc. Visual Tools, Inc. was acquired by Sybase Software in 1996. Mr. Brown received a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Missouri - Columbia in 1979 and a M.S. in Molecular and Cellular Biology at the University of Missouri - Kansas City in 1997.

 

RICK L. WELLER, Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer. Mr. Weller has been Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Euronet since he joined Euronet in November 2002. From January 2002 to October 2002, he was the sole proprietor of Pivotal Associates, a business development firm. From November 1999 to December 2001, Mr. Weller held the position of Chief Operating Officer of ionex telecommunications, inc., a local exchange company. He is a certified public accountant and received his B.S. in Accounting from the University of Central Missouri.

 

SCOTT D. CLAASSEN, General Counsel and Secretary. Mr. Claassen has been General Counsel and Secretary of Euronet since joining the Company in May 2020. Prior to this, he practiced corporate law with Stinson LLP and Shook, Hardy and Bacon LLP.  He is a member of the Missouri bar. He received a B.S. in Agriculture from Kansas State University, an MBA from the University of Kansas and a law degree from Harvard Law School.

KEVIN J. CAPONECCHI, Executive Vice President, Chief Executive Officer, epay, Software and EFT Asia Pacific Division. Mr. Caponecchi joined Euronet in July 2007 and served as President until assuming his current role in December 2014. Prior to joining Euronet, Mr. Caponecchi served in various capacities with subsidiaries of General Electric Company for 17 years. From 2003 until June 2007, Mr. Caponecchi served as President of GE Global Signaling, a provider of products and services to freight, passenger and mass transit systems. From 1998 through 2002, Mr. Caponecchi served as General Manager - Technology for GE Consumer & Industrial, a provider of consumer appliances, lighting products and electrical products. Mr. Caponecchi holds degrees in physics from Franklin and Marshall College and industrial engineering from Columbia University.

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JUAN C. BIANCHI, Executive Vice President - Chief Executive Officer, Money Transfer Segment. Mr. Bianchi joined Euronet subsequent to the acquisition of Ria in 2007. Prior to the acquisition, Mr. Bianchi served as the Chief Executive Officer of Ria and has spent his entire career at either Ria or AFEX Money Express, a money transfer company purchased by Ria's founders. Mr. Bianchi began his career at AFEX in Chile in 1992, joined AFEX USA's operations in 1996, and became chief operating officer of AFEX-Ria in 2003. Mr. Bianchi studied business at the Universidad Andres Bello in Chile and completed the Executive Program in Management at UCLA's John E. Anderson School of Business.


NIKOS FOUNTAS, Executive Vice President - Chief Executive Officer, EFT Europe, Middle East and Africa Division. Mr. Fountas has been Executive Vice President of the Company's EFT Processing Segment in Europe since December 2012. Mr. Fountas joined Euronet subsequent to the Company's 2005 acquisition of Instreamline S.A. (now Euronet Card Services) in Greece. He served as managing director of the Company's Greece EFT subsidiary, responsible for Euronet's European card processing and cross-border acquiring operations until September 2009. In September 2009, Mr. Fountas took over responsibilities as managing director of Euronet's Europe EFT Processing Segment. Prior to joining Euronet, Mr. Fountas spent over 20 years working in management and executive-level positions in the IT field for several companies, including IBM for 12 years. He has a degree in computer science (Honors) from York University in Canada and post graduate studies in business administration from Henley Management School and IBM Business Professional Institute.

 

MARTIN L. BRUCKNER, Senior Vice President - Chief Technology Officer. Mr. Bruckner has been Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer of Euronet since January 2014. Mr. Bruckner joined Euronet in 2007 as head of software development and IT operations for Transact GmbH. In 2009, he was promoted to Chief Technology Officer of Euronet's epay segment. Prior to joining Euronet, Mr. Bruckner established his own IT company called MLB Development GmbH, where he developed software systems for various European companies. Mr. Bruckner has more than 20 years of software development experience and published his first software product (BBS systems) at the age of 15. He received a Doctorate of Law from the University of Rostock and a law degree from the University of Bielefeld.


Availability of Reports, Certain Committee Charters and Other Information

 

Our Website addresses are www.euronetworldwide.com and www.eeft.com. We make available all SEC public filings, including our annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and all amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Sections 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended ("Exchange Act") on our Websites free of charge as soon as reasonably practicable after these documents are electronically filed with, or furnished to, the SEC. The information on our Websites is not, and shall not be deemed to be, a part of this report or incorporated into any other filings we make with the SEC. In addition, our SEC filings are made available via the SEC's EDGAR filing system accessible at www.sec.gov.

 

The charters for our Audit, Compensation, and Corporate Governance and Nominating Committees, as well as the Code of Business Conduct & Ethics for our employees, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, are available on our Website at www.euronetworldwide.com in the "For Investors" section under "Corporate Governance / Documents and Charters".

Item 1A. Risk Factors

 

Our operations are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties, including those described below. You should carefully consider the risks described below before making an investment decision. The risks and uncertainties described below are not necessarily organized in order of priority or probability.

 

If any of the following risks actually occurs, our business, financial condition or results of operations could be materially adversely affected. In that case, the trading price of our Common Stock could decline substantially.

 

This Annual Report also contains forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. Our actual results could differ materially from those anticipated in the forward-looking statements as a result of a number of factors, including the risks described below and elsewhere in this Annual Report. 



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GOVERNMENT AND REGULATION


Because we are a multinational company conducting a complex business in many markets worldwide, we are subject to legal and operational risks related to a broad array of local legal and regulatory requirements which could adversely affect our operations.


Operating outside of the U.S. creates difficulties associated with our international operations, as well as complying with local legal and regulatory requirements. We operate financial transaction processing networks that offer new products and services to customers, and the laws and regulations in the markets in which we operate evolve and are subject to rapid change. Although we have knowledgeable local staff in countries in which we deem it appropriate, we cannot assure you that we will continue to be found to be operating in compliance with all applicable customs, currency exchange control, data protection, anti-money laundering, sanctions, employment, transfer pricing and other laws or regulations to which we may be subject. We also cannot assure you that these laws will not be modified in ways that may adversely affect our business.


For our epay Segment, as we continue to expand our electronic payment product offerings, certain of those products may become regulated by state, federal or foreign laws, rules and regulations, including the U.S. CFPB. New product offerings may be considered to be money transfer related products which would require licensure for entities distributing or processing such products. If such products become more highly regulated and ultimately require licensure, our epay business may be adversely affected. Further, if regulations regarding the expiration of gift vouchers change in the countries where we offer them, the revenue epay recognizes from unredeemed vouchers may be negatively affected.

Our money transfer services are subject to regulation by the U.S. states in which we operate, by the U.S. federal government and the governments of the other countries in which we operate. Changes in the laws, rules and regulations of these governmental entities, and our ability to obtain or retain required licensure, could have a material adverse impact on our results of operations, financial condition and cash flow.


Additionally, the evolving regulatory environment may change the competitive landscape across various jurisdictions and adversely affect our financial results. If governments implement new laws or regulations, or organizations such as Visa® and Mastercard® issue new rules, that effectively limit our ability to provide DCC or set fees and/or foreign currency exchange spreads, then our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected. In addition, changes in regulatory interpretations or practices could increase the risk of regulatory enforcement actions, fines and penalties and such changes may be replicated across multiple jurisdictions.

In March 2018, the E.U. proposed additional regulations on cross border transactions within the E.U., including specific regulations on DCC. In December 2018, the European Commission, European Council and European Parliament agreed to legislation that requires disclosure of foreign exchange margins applicable to DCC transactions and eventual comparability between foreign exchange rates offered by DCC providers and bank card issuers. The new legislation went into effect in April 2020.  Such regulation could materially and adversely impact our financial results, by reducing the number of DCC transactions performed over our networks and the level of profit we generate from such transactions.

 

The E.U. has passed a regulation called the GDPR that establishes stringent requirements for the collection and processing of personal information of individuals within the E.U. The GDPR came into effect across the E.U. on May 25, 2018. The GDPR established stringent requirements for the collection and processing of personal information of individuals within the E.U., established certain rights of individuals regarding personal information processed by companies as well as requirements for information security and imposed significant fines that may be revenue-based for violation of its requirements. The GDPR applies to transfers of personal information from the E.U. to countries outside the E.U., including the U.S.  Any failure on our part to meet the requirements of the GDPR could result in the imposition of fines and penalties that could materially and adversely affect our financial results.


We conduct a significant portion of our business in Central and Eastern European countries, and we have subsidiaries in the Middle East, Asia Pacific and South America, where the risk of continued political, economic and regulatory change that could impact our operating results is greater than in the U.S. or Western Europe.

 

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We have subsidiaries in Central and Eastern Europe, the Middle East, Asia Pacific and South America. We expect to continue to expand our operations to other countries in these regions. Some of these countries have undergone significant political, economic and social change in recent years and the risk of new, unforeseen changes in these countries remains greater than in the U.S. or Western Europe. In particular, changes in laws or regulations or in the interpretation of existing laws or regulations, whether caused by a change in government or otherwise, could materially adversely affect our business, growth, financial condition or results of operations.


For example, currently there are no limitations in any of the countries in which we have subsidiaries on the repatriation of profits from these countries, but foreign currency exchange control restrictions, taxes or limitations may be imposed or tightened in the future with regard to repatriation of earnings and investments from these countries. If exchange control restrictions, taxes or limitations are imposed or tightened, our ability to receive dividends or other payments from affected subsidiaries could be reduced, which may have a material adverse effect on us. As discussed under "Liquidity and Capital Resources" in Item 7 - Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, under existing U.S. tax laws, repatriation of certain assets to the U.S. could have adverse tax consequences.

In addition, corporate, contract, property, insolvency, competition, securities and other laws and regulations in many of the countries in which we operate have been, and continue to be, substantially revised. Therefore, the interpretation and procedural safeguards of the new legal and regulatory systems are in the process of being developed and defined, and existing laws and regulations may be applied inconsistently. Also, in some circumstances, it may not be possible to obtain the legal remedies provided for under these laws and regulations in a reasonably timely manner, if at all.


We conduct business in many international markets with complex and evolving tax rules, including value added tax rules, which subjects us to international tax compliance risks which could adversely affect our operating results.

 

While we obtain advice from legal and tax advisors as necessary to help assure compliance with tax and regulatory matters, most tax jurisdictions that we operate in have complex and subjective rules regarding the valuation of intercompany services, cross-border payments between affiliated companies and the related effects on income tax, value added tax (“VAT”), transfer tax and share registration tax. Our foreign subsidiaries frequently undergo VAT reviews, and from time to time undergo comprehensive tax reviews and may be required to make additional tax payments should the review result in different interpretations, allocations or valuations of our products and services.

Additionally, as a result of economic downturns, tax receipts have decreased and/or government spending has increased in many of the countries in which we operate. Consequently, governments may increase tax rates or implement new taxes in order to compensate for gaps between tax revenues and expenditures. Governments may prohibit or restrict the use of certain legal structures designed to minimize taxes. Any such tax increases, whether borne by us or our customers, could negatively impact our operating results or the demand for our products and services.

We could be adversely affected by violations of the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act or other similar anti-corruption laws.


Our operations in countries outside the United States are subject to anti-corruption laws and regulations, including restrictions imposed by the FCPA. The FCPA and similar anti-corruption laws in other jurisdictions, such as the U.K. Bribery Act, generally prohibit companies and their intermediaries from making improper payments to government officials or employees of commercial enterprises for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business. We operate in many parts of the world that have experienced corruption to some degree and, in certain circumstances, strict compliance with anti-corruption laws may conflict with local customs and practices.

Our employees and agents interact with government officials on our behalf, including as necessary to obtain licenses and other regulatory approvals necessary to operate our business, import or export equipment, employ expatriates and resolve tax disputes. We also have a number of contracts with foreign governments or entities owned or controlled by foreign governments. These interactions and contracts create a risk of violation of the FCPA or other similar laws.

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Although we have implemented policies and procedures designed to ensure compliance with local laws and regulations as well as U.S. laws and regulations, including the FCPA, there can be no assurance that all of our employees, consultants, contractors and agents will abide by our policies. If we are found to be liable for violations of the FCPA or similar anti-corruption laws in other jurisdictions, either due to our own or others' acts or inadvertence, we could suffer from criminal or civil penalties which could have a material and adverse effect on our results of operations, financial condition and cash flows. 

Our operating results in the money transfer business may be harmed if there are adverse changes in worker immigration patterns, our ability to expand our share of the existing electronic market and to expand into new markets and our ability to continue complying with regulations issued by the OFAC, BSA, FINCEN, USA PATRIOT Act regulations, the Dodd-Frank Act or any other existing or future regulations that impact any aspect of our money transfer business.

Our money transfer business primarily focuses on workers who migrate to foreign countries in search of employment and then send a portion of their earnings to family members in their home countries. Changes in U.S. and foreign government policies or enforcement, including changes that have been, or may be, implemented by the U.S. President or Congress, toward immigration may have a negative effect on immigration in the U.S. and other countries, which could also have an adverse impact on our money transfer revenues.


Both U.S. and foreign regulators have become increasingly aggressive in the enforcement of the various regulatory regimes applicable to our businesses and the imposition of fines and penalties in the event of violations. Our ability to continue complying with the requirements of OFAC, BSA, FINCEN, the USA PATRIOT Act, the Dodd-Frank Act and other regulations (both U.S. and foreign) is important to our success in achieving growth and an inability to do this could have an adverse impact on our revenues and earnings. Anti-money laundering, sanctions, and consumer protection regulations require us to be responsible for the compliance by agents with such regulations. Although we have training and compliance programs in place, we cannot be certain our agents will comply with such regulations and we may be held responsible for their failure to comply, resulting in fines and penalties. Future growth and profitability depend upon expansion within the markets in which we currently operate and the development of new markets for our money transfer services. Our expansion into new markets is dependent upon our ability to successfully apply our existing technology or to develop new applications to satisfy market demand. We may not have adequate financial and technological resources to expand our distribution channels and product applications to satisfy these demands, which may have an adverse impact on our ability to achieve expected growth in revenues and earnings.

SUPPLY CHAIN AND THIRD PARTIES

Because we typically enter into short-term contracts with content providers and retailers, our epay business is subject to the risk of non-renewal of those contracts, or renewal under less favorable terms.

 

Our contracts with content providers to distribute and process content, including prepaid mobile airtime top-up services, typically have terms of less than three years. Many of those contracts may be canceled by either party upon three months' notice. Our contracts with content providers are not exclusive, so these providers may enter into contracts with other service providers. In addition, our service contracts with major retailers typically have terms of one to three years, and our contracts with smaller retailers typically may be canceled by either party upon three to six months' notice. The cancellation or non-renewal of one or more of our significant content provider or retail contracts, or of a large enough group of our contracts with smaller retailers, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. The renewal of contracts under less favorable payment terms, commission terms or other terms could have a material adverse impact on our working capital requirements and/or results from operations. In addition, our contracts generally permit operators to reduce our fees at any time. Commission revenue or fee reductions by any of the content providers could also have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.


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The prepaid marketplace is currently experiencing high growth in the differentiation of product offerings. While our epay business is focused on expanding and differentiating its suite of prepaid product offerings on a global basis, there can be no assurance that we will be able to enter into relationships on favorable terms with additional content providers or renew or expand current relationships and contracts on favorable terms. Inability to continue to grow our suite of electronic payment product offerings could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.


The stability and growth of our EFT Processing Segment may be adversely affected if we are unable to maintain our current card acceptance and ATM management agreements with banks and international card organizations, and to secure new arrangements for card acceptance and ATM management.

 

The stability and future growth of our EFT Processing Segment depends in part on our ability to sign card acceptance and ATM management agreements with banks and international card organizations. Card acceptance agreements allow our ATMs to accept credit and debit cards issued by banks and international card organizations. ATM management agreements generate service income from our management of ATMs for banks.


These agreements have expiration dates, and banks and international card organizations are generally not obligated to renew them. Our existing contracts generally have terms of five to seven years and a number of them expire or are up for renewal each year. In some cases, banks may terminate their contracts prior to the expiration of their terms. We cannot assure you that we will be able to continue to sign or maintain these agreements on terms and conditions acceptable to us or that international card organizations will continue to permit our ATMs to accept their credit and debit cards. The inability to continue to sign or maintain these agreements, or to continue to accept the credit and debit cards of local banks and international card organizations at our ATMs in the future, could have a material adverse effect on our business, growth, financial condition or results of operations.

In some cases, we are dependent upon international card organizations and national transaction processing switches to provide assistance in obtaining settlement from card issuers of funds relating to transactions on our ATMs, and any failure by them to provide the required cooperation could result in our inability to obtain settlement of funds relating to transactions.

Our ATMs dispense cash relating to transactions on credit and debit cards issued by banks. We have in place arrangements for the settlement to us of all of those transactions, but in some cases, we do not have a direct relationship with the card-issuing bank and rely for settlement on the application of rules that are administered by international card associations (such as Visa® or Mastercard®) or national transaction processing switching networks. If a bankcard issuer fails to settle transactions in accordance with those rules, we are dependent upon cooperation from such associations or switching networks to enforce our right of settlement against such associations. Failure by such organizations or switches to provide the required cooperation could result in our inability to obtain settlement of funds relating to transactions and adversely affect our business. Moreover, international card associations and issuers of their cards (and, in the case of Visa, member banks) have the ability to change or apply their rules in ways that could negatively impact our business. As an example, DCC is not permitted on certain cards in certain geographic territories, and the scope of such restrictions could be extended. Any such change or application of the rules of international card associations could materially and adversely affect our business.

We could incur substantial losses if one of the third party depository institutions or financial institutions we use in our operations were to fail.

 

As part of our business operations, we maintain cash balances at third party depository institutions. We could incur substantial losses if a financial institution in which we have significant deposits fails.

 

Our money transfer business involves transferring funds internationally and is dependent upon foreign and domestic financial institutions, including our competitors, to execute funds transfers and foreign currency transactions. Changes to existing regulations of financial institution operations, such as those designed to combat terrorism or money laundering, could require us to alter our operating procedures in a manner that increases our cost of doing business or to terminate certain product offerings. In addition, as a result of existing regulations and/or changes to those regulations, financial institutions could decide to cease providing the services on which we depend, requiring us to terminate certain product offerings.

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We are required under certain national laws and the rules of financial transaction switching networks in many of our markets to have ''sponsors'' to operate ATMs and switch ATM transactions. Our failure to secure ''sponsor'' arrangements in any of our markets that require bank sponsors could prevent us from doing business in that market.


Under the laws of some countries, only a licensed financial institution may operate ATMs. Because we are not a licensed financial institution outside of the E.U. we are required to have a ''sponsor'' bank to conduct ATM operations in those countries. In addition, in all of our non-E.U. markets, the rules governing national transaction switching networks owned or operated by banks, and other international financial transaction switching networks operated by organizations such as Citibank, Visa® and Mastercard®, require any company sending transactions through these switches to be a bank or a technical service processor that is approved and monitored by a bank. As a result, the operation of our ATM network in many of our markets depends on our ability to secure these ''sponsor'' arrangements with financial institutions.


To date, we have been successful in reaching contractual arrangements that have permitted us to operate in all of our target markets. However, we cannot assure you that we will continue to be successful in reaching these arrangements, and it is possible that our current arrangements will not continue to be renewed. If we are unable to secure “sponsor” arrangements in any market, we could be prevented from doing business in that market.

We rely on third party financial institutions to provide us with a portion of the cash required to operate our ATM networks in certain countries. If these institutions were unable or unwilling to provide us with the cash necessary to operate our ATM networks, we would be required to locate additional alternative sources of cash to operate these networks.

In our EFT Processing Segment, we primarily rely on third party financial institutions in certain countries in Europe and Asia Pacific to provide us with the cash required to operate our ATM networks. Under our agreements with these providers, we pay fees or interest, which is generally variable and could increase, based on the total amount of cash we are using from such provider at a given time, as well as other costs such as bank fees and cash transportation costs. As of December 31, 2020, the amount of cash used in our ATM networks under these supply agreements was approximately $616.3 million. Before the cash is disbursed to ATM customers, beneficial ownership of the cash is generally retained by the cash providers, and we have no access or proprietary rights to the cash.

 

Our existing agreements with cash providers are generally multi-year agreements that expire at various times. However, each provider may have the right to demand the return of all or any portion of its cash at any time upon the occurrence of certain events beyond our control, including certain bankruptcy events affecting us or our subsidiaries, or a breach of the terms of our cash provider agreements.

 

If any of our cash supply providers were to demand return of their cash or terminate their agreements with us and remove their cash from our ATM devices, or if they fail to provide us with the cash our operations require, our ability to operate the ATM networks to which the provider supplies cash would be jeopardized, and we would need to locate additional alternative sources of cash, including, potentially the increased use of our own cash. Under those circumstances, the terms and conditions of the new or renewed agreements could potentially be less favorable to us, which would negatively impact our results of operations. Furthermore, restrictions on our access to cash to supply our ATMs could severely restrict our ability to keep our ATMs operating, which could subject us to performance penalties under our contracts with our customers.

 

We have encountered difficulty in obtaining cash supply arrangements in certain of our markets, including Greece, and directly provide cash for our ATM transactions in those markets. While the amounts involved are currently well within our capabilities given our cash flows and available financing, any failure to renew a major cash supply arrangement could require that we commit significant financial resources to the supply of cash to our ATM networks, which could adversely impact our results of operations.

If we are unable to maintain our money transfer agent and correspondent networks, our business may be adversely affected.

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Our consumer-to-consumer money transfer based revenues are primarily generated through the use of our agent and correspondent networks. If agents or correspondents decide to leave our network or if we are unable to sign new agents or correspondents, our revenue and profit growth rates may be adversely affected. Our agents and correspondents are also subject to a wide variety of laws and regulations that vary significantly, depending on the legal jurisdiction. Changes in these laws and regulations could adversely affect our ability to maintain the networks or the cost of providing money transfer services. In addition, agents may generate fewer transactions or less revenue due to various factors, including increased competition. Because our agents and correspondents are third parties that may sell products and provide services in addition to our money transfer services, they may encounter business difficulties unrelated to the provision of our services, which may cause the agents or correspondents to reduce their number of locations or hours of operation, or cease doing business altogether.


CORPORATE GROWTH STRATEGIES

Our business may suffer from risks related to acquisitions and potential future acquisitions.

 

A substantial portion of our growth has been due to acquisitions, and we continue to evaluate and engage in discussions concerning potential acquisition opportunities, some of which could be material. We cannot assure you that we will be able to successfully integrate, or otherwise realize anticipated benefits from, our recent acquisitions or any future acquisitions. Failure to successfully integrate or otherwise realize the anticipated benefits of these acquisitions could adversely impact our long-term competitiveness and profitability. The integration of any future acquisitions will involve a number of risks that could harm our financial condition, results of operations and competitive position. In particular:

  • The integration plans for our acquisitions are based on benefits that involve assumptions as to future events, including our ability to successfully achieve anticipated synergies, leveraging our existing relationships, as well as general business and industry conditions, many of which are beyond our control and may not materialize. Unforeseen factors may offset components of our integration plans in whole or in part. As a result, our actual results may vary considerably, or be considerably delayed, compared to our estimates;
  • The integration process could disrupt the activities of the businesses that are being combined. The combination of companies requires, among other things, coordination of administrative and other functions. In addition, the loss of key employees, customers or vendors of acquired businesses could materially and adversely impact the integration of the acquired businesses;
  • The execution of our integration plans may divert the attention of our management from other key responsibilities;
  • We may assume unanticipated liabilities and contingencies; or
  • Our acquisition targets could fail to perform in accordance with our expectations at the time of purchase.

Future acquisitions may be effected through the issuance of our common stock or securities convertible into our common stock, which could substantially dilute the ownership percentage of our current stockholders. In addition, shares issued in connection with future acquisitions could be publicly tradable, which could result in a material decrease in the market price of our common stock. Certain factors on which our ability to expand each of our divisions is dependent are set forth at Item 7, Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations - Opportunities and Challenges. If any of such factors impede our ability to expand our businesses, our results of operations and financial condition could be materially and adversely affected.

 

Our operating results depend, in part, on the volume of transactions on ATMs in our network and the fees we can collect from processing these transactions. We generally have little control over the ATM transaction fees established in the markets where we operate, and therefore, cannot control any potential reductions in these fees which may adversely affect our results of operations.

Transaction fees from banks, customers and international card organizations for transactions processed on our ATMs have historically accounted for a substantial portion of our revenues. These fees are set by agreement among all banks in a particular market. The future operating results of our ATM business depend on the following factors:


      the acceptance of our ATM processing and management services in our target markets;

      the maintenance of the level of transaction fees we receive;

      the continued use of our ATMs by credit and debit cardholders; and

      our ability to generate revenues from interchange fees and from other value added services, including dynamic currency conversion.

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The amount of fees we receive per transaction is set in various ways in the markets in which we do business. We have card acceptance agreements or ATM management agreements with some banks under which fees are set. However, we derive a significant portion of our revenues in many markets from interchange fees, surcharges or cash withdrawal related services that are set by the central ATM processing switch or various card organizations. The banks that participate in these switches or the card organizations that enable the services or transactions set the interchange fee and/or establish the rules regarding the services allowed, and we are not in a position in any market to greatly influence these fees or rules, which may change over time. A significant decrease in the interchange fee, or limitations placed on our ability to offer value added services via our ATM network, in any market could adversely affect our results in that market.


Although we believe that the volume of transactions in developing countries may increase due to growth in the number of cards being issued by banks in these markets, we anticipate that transaction levels on any given ATM in developing markets will not increase significantly. We can attempt to improve the levels of transactions on our ATM network overall by acquiring good sites for our ATMs, eliminating poor locations, entering new, less-developed markets and adding new transactions, including new value added services, to the sets of transactions that are available on our ATMs. However, we may not be successful in materially increasing transaction levels through these measures. Per-transaction fees paid by international card organizations have declined in certain markets in the past and competitive factors have required us to reduce the transaction fees we charge customers. If we cannot continue to increase our transaction levels and per-transaction fees generally decline, our results would be adversely affected.

If consumer confidence in our business or brands declines, our business may be adversely affected.

Our business relies on customer confidence in our brands and our ability to provide efficient and reliable products and services across each of our segments. For our Money Transfer division, a decline in customer confidence in our business or brands, or in traditional money transfer providers as a means to transfer money, may adversely impact transaction volumes which would, in turn, be expected to adversely impact our business and possibly result in recording charges for the impairment of goodwill and/or other long-lived assets.

 

CAPITAL MARKETS AND ECONOMIC CONDITIONS

The outbreak of COVID-19 (coronavirus) has negatively impacted and could continue to negatively impact the global economy. In addition, the COVID-19 pandemic could disrupt or otherwise negatively impact global credit markets and our operations, including the demand for our products and services.

 

The significant outbreak of COVID-19 has resulted in a widespread health crisis, which has negatively impacted and could continue to negatively impact the global economy. In addition, the global and regional impact of the outbreak, including official or unofficial quarantines and governmental restrictions on activities taken in response to such event, has had, and could continue to have a negative impact on our operations, reduced consumer demand for our products and services due to reduced consumer traffic in, or closure of, retail and other locations where our products and services are offered, including voluntary or mandatory temporary closures of our facilities or those of our agents or customers; interruptions in our supply chain, which could impact the cost or availability of equipment; disruptions or restrictions on our ability to travel or to market and distribute our products and services; and labor shortages.

For example, the COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in travel restrictions within and between countries, including mandatory quarantine requirements for travelers from certain locations, and varying degrees of “sheltering in-place” and other social distancing orders in most of the countries where we do business.  Among other things, these orders restrict which businesses are allowed to be open and the conditions under which they are allowed to operate.  Although the majority of these orders went into effect at the end of February 2020 and throughout various times in March 2020, new orders continue to be implemented, or reinstated, as the pandemic spreads around the global and new hot spots flare up. These travel restrictions and orders, as well as increased unemployment and general economic uncertainty caused by the pandemic, have negatively impacted our financial results. The EFT operating segment has experienced declines in DCC and surcharge transaction volumes as the factors noted above have reduced these high-margin transactions on our network of ATMs. For the epay and Money Transfer operating segments, the disruption in business of the retailers and agents that offer our services and products may adversely affect their ability to remain in business and/or timely remit payments owed to us.  All of these factors, in turn, may not only impact our operations, financial condition and demand for our products and services but our overall ability to react timely to mitigate the impact of this event.

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The COVID-19 outbreak could disrupt or otherwise negatively impact credit markets, which could adversely affect the availability and cost of capital. Such impacts could limit our ability to fund our operations and satisfy our obligations.

The extent and potential impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on our operational and financial performance will depend on future developments, including the duration, severity and spread of the virus, the speed and effectiveness of rollouts for vaccines and treatments, actions that may be taken by governmental authorities and the impact on our supply chain, customers, operations, workforce and the financial markets, all of which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted. These and other potential impacts of an epidemic, pandemic or other health crisis, such as COVID-19, could therefore materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We are subject to business cycles, seasonality and other outside factors that may negatively affect our business.

A recessionary economic environment in any of our markets or other outside factors could have a negative impact on banks, mobile phone operators, content providers, retailers and our individual customers and could reduce the level of transactions in all of our divisions, which would, in turn, negatively impact our financial results. If banks, mobile phone operators and content providers experience decreased demand for their products and services, or if the locations where we provide services decrease in number, we will process fewer transactions, resulting in lower revenues. In addition, a recessionary economic environment could reduce the level of transactions taking place on our networks, which will have a negative impact on our business.

Our experience is that the level of transactions on our networks is also subject to substantial seasonal variation. In the EFT Processing Segment, mostly in Europe, we usually experience our heaviest demand for dynamic currency conversion during the third quarter of the fiscal year, coinciding with the tourism season in Europe. As a result, our revenues earned in the third quarter of the year will usually be greater than other quarters of the fiscal year. Additionally, transaction levels have consistently been higher in the fourth quarter of the fiscal year due to increased use of ATMs, prepaid products and money transfer services during the holiday season. Generally, the level of transactions drops in the first quarter, during which transaction levels are generally the lowest we experience during the year, which reduces the level of revenues that we record.  In the Money Transfer Segment, we experience increased transaction levels during the May through October timeframe, coinciding with certain holidays and the increase in worker migration patterns. As a result of these seasonal variations, our quarterly operating results may fluctuate materially and could lead to volatility in the price of our shares.

Additionally, economic or political instability, wars, civil unrest, terrorism, epidemics (including but not limited to, Coronavirus outbreak) and natural disasters may make money transfers to, from or within a particular country more difficult. The inability to timely complete money transfers could adversely affect our business.

Economic cycles may lead us to recognize impairment charges related to long-lived assets and goodwill recorded in connection with our acquisitions, which would adversely impact our results of operations. Our total assets include approximately $787.7 million, or 16% of total assets, in goodwill and acquired intangible assets recorded as a result of acquisitions. We assess our goodwill, intangible assets and other long-lived assets as and when required by accounting principles generally accepted in the U.S. to determine whether they are impaired. For example, during 2020, we incurred goodwill and acquired intangible asset impairment charges of $106.6 million. If operating results in any of our key markets, including Australia, Germany, Greece, Malaysia, India, New Zealand, the U.S., U.K., Poland and Romania, deteriorate or our plans do not progress as expected when we acquired these entities, or if capital markets depress our value or that of similar companies, we may be required to record additional impairment write-downs of goodwill, intangible assets or other long-lived assets. This could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

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We have a substantial amount of debt and other contractual commitments, and while the cost of servicing those obligations is not expected to adversely affect our business, the risk could increase if we incur more debt. We may be required to prepay our obligations under the credit facility.

As of December 31, 2020, total liabilities were $3,480.8 million, of which $1,437.6 million represents long-term debt obligations, and total assets were $4,926.7 million. We may not have sufficient funds to satisfy all such obligations as a result of a variety of factors, some of which may be beyond our control. If the opportunity of a strategic acquisition arises or if we enter into new contracts that require the installation or servicing of infrastructure, such as processing centers, ATM machines or POS terminals on a faster pace than anticipated, we may be required to incur additional debt for these purposes and to fund our working capital needs, including ATM network cash, which we may not be able to obtain. The level of our indebtedness could have important consequences to investors, including the following: 

 

      our ability to obtain any necessary financing in the future for working capital, capital expenditures, debt service requirements or other purposes may be limited or financing may be unavailable;

      a portion of our cash flows must be dedicated to the payment of principal and interest on our indebtedness and other obligations and will not be available for use in our business;

      our level of indebtedness could limit our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business and the markets in which we operate;

      our level of indebtedness will make us more vulnerable to changes in general economic conditions and/or a downturn in our business, thereby making it more difficult for us to satisfy our obligations; and

      because a portion of our debt bears interest at a variable rate of interest, our actual debt service obligations could increase as a result of adverse changes in interest rates.


If we fail to make required debt payments, or if we fail to comply with other covenants in our debt service agreements, we would be in default under the terms of these agreements. This default would permit the holders of the indebtedness to accelerate repayment of this debt and could cause defaults under other indebtedness that we have.

Restrictive covenants in our credit facilities may adversely affect us. Our Credit Facility contains two financial covenants that we must meet as defined in the agreement: (1) Consolidated Total Leverage Ratio, and (2) Consolidated Interest Coverage Ratio. To remain in compliance with our debt covenants, we may be required to increase Earnings Before Interest, Taxes, Depreciation and Amortization ("EBITDA"), repay debt, or both. We cannot assure you that we will have sufficient assets, liquidity or EBITDA to meet or avoid these obligations, which could have an adverse impact on our financial condition.

Our ability to secure additional financing for growth or to refinance any of our existing debt is also dependent upon the availability of credit in the marketplace, which has experienced severe disruptions in the past. If we are unable to secure additional financing or such financing is not available at acceptable terms, we may be unable to secure financing for growth or refinance our debt obligations, if necessary.


Because we derive our revenues from a multitude of countries with different currencies, our business may be adversely affected by local inflation and foreign currency exchange rates and policies.

 

We report our results in U.S. dollars, although a majority of our income is realized in foreign currencies. As exchange rates among the U.S. dollar, the euro, and other currencies fluctuate, the impact of these fluctuations may have a material adverse effect on our results of operations or financial condition as reported in U.S. dollars.


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A significant number of our ATMs are located in countries in the European Union that use the euro. From time to time, some of these countries, have considered leaving the European Union and adopting another currency. If such an event were to occur, the conversion of cash that we hold in banks and in our ATM network in that country from euros to another currency could have an adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations, either from initial conversion or from subsequent changes in currency exchange rates. The magnitude of this risk increases when cash balances in our ATM network increase during the tourism season.

 

Our Money Transfer Segment is subject to foreign currency exchange risks because our customers deposit funds in one currency at our retail and agent locations worldwide or in an online account and we typically deliver funds denominated in a different, destination country currency. Although we use foreign currency derivative contracts to mitigate a portion of this risk, we cannot eliminate all of the exposure to the impact of changes in foreign currency exchange rates for the period between collection and disbursement of the money transfers.

CYBER, PHYSICAL ASSET, AND DATA SECURITY

 

Our business may be adversely affected if recent developments to applicable data protection regulations in the European Union require us to cease the transfer of personal data from the European Union to the United States.


In July 2020, the European Court of Justice invalidated the EU-US Privacy Shield as a lawful mechanism for transferring personal data to the US as a result of concerns related to surveillance by law enforcement agencies and a lack of judicial redress by individuals in the EU (known as the “Schrems II” decision). Euronet has relied on an alternate mechanism of personal data transfer, called the Standard Contractual Clauses (“SCCs”), since the enforcement of GDPR in 2018.  In November 2020, the European Data Protection Board issued a series of recommendations regarding supplementary measures to the SCCs, which Euronet is currently implementing.  Our money transfer business relies on the transfer of personal data of individuals in the EU to the US to enable payment of money remittance transactions to beneficiaries through our correspondent network.  If we are unable to transfer personal data from the EU to the US or other countries where we operate, then it could affect the manner in which we provide our services and adversely affect our financial results.

Because our business is highly dependent on the proper operation of our computer networks and telecommunications connections, significant technical disruptions to these systems would adversely affect our revenues and financial results.

Our business involves the operation and maintenance of sophisticated computer networks and telecommunications connections with financial institutions, mobile phone operators, other content providers, retailers and agents. This, in turn, requires the maintenance of computer equipment and infrastructure, including telecommunications and electrical systems, and the integration and enhancement of complex software applications. There are operational risks inherent in this type of business that can result in the temporary shutdown of part or all of our processing systems, such as failure of electrical supply, failure of computer hardware, security breaches and software errors. Any operational problem in our processing centers may have a significant adverse impact on the operation of our networks. Even with disaster recovery procedures in place, these risks cannot be eliminated entirely, and any technical failure that prevents operation of our systems for a significant period of time will prevent us from processing transactions during that period of time and will directly and adversely affect our revenues and financial results.

We are subject to security breaches of our systems. Any such breach may cause us to incur financial losses, liability, harm to our reputation, litigation, regulatory enforcement actions and limitations on our ability to conduct our businesses.

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We capture, transmit, handle and store sensitive information in conducting and managing electronic, financial and mobile transactions, such as card information, PIN numbers and personal information of various types. These businesses involve certain inherent security risks, in particular: the risk of electronic interception and theft of the information for use in fraudulent or other card transactions by persons outside the Company, including third party vendors or by our own employees; and the use of fraudulent cards on our network of owned or outsourced ATMs and POS devices. We incorporate industry-standard encryption technology and processing methodology into our systems and software, and maintain controls and procedures regarding access to our computer systems by employees and others, to maintain high levels of security. Although this technology and methodology decreases security risks, they cannot be eliminated entirely as criminal elements apply increasingly sophisticated technology to attempt to obtain unauthorized access to the information handled by ATM, money transfer and electronic financial transaction networks. Our services and infrastructure are increasingly reliant on the Internet. Computer networks and the Internet are vulnerable to unauthorized access, computer viruses and other disruptive problems such as denial of service attacks or other cyber-attacks carried out by cyber criminals or state-sponsored actors. Other potential attacks include attempts to obtain unauthorized access to confidential information or destroy data, often through the introduction of computer viruses, ransomware or malware, cyber-attacks and other means, which are constantly evolving and difficult to detect. Those same parties may also attempt to fraudulently induce employees, customers, vendors, or other users of our systems through phishing schemes or other methods to disclose sensitive information in order to gain access to our data or that of our customers or clients. In addition, the cost and timeframes required for implementation of new technology may result in a time lag between availability of such technology and our adoption of it. Further, our controls, procedures and technology may not be able to detect when there is a breach, causing a delay in our ability to mitigate it. As previously disclosed in our SEC filings, we have been the subject of computer security breaches, and we cannot exclude the possibility of additional breaches in the future.

Any breach in our security systems could result in the perpetration of fraudulent financial transactions for which we may bear the liability. We are insured against various risks, including theft and negligence, but such insurance coverage is subject to deductibles, exclusions and limits that may leave us bearing some or all of any losses arising from security breaches.

We also collect, transfer and retain personal data as part of our money transfer business. These activities are subject to certain privacy laws and regulations in the U.S. and in other jurisdictions where our money transfer services are offered. We maintain technical and operational safeguards designed to comply with applicable legal requirements. Despite these safeguards, there remains a risk that these safeguards could be breached resulting in improper access to, and disclosure of, sensitive customer information. Under state, federal and foreign laws requiring consumer notification of security breaches, the costs to remediate security breaches can be substantial. Breaches of our security policies or applicable legal requirements resulting in a compromise of customer data could expose us to regulatory enforcement action, subject us to litigation, limit our ability to provide money transfer services and/or cause harm to our reputation. 

In addition to electronic fraud issues and breaches of our systems, the possible theft and vandalism of ATMs or cash in the ATMs present risks for our ATM business. We install ATMs at high-traffic sites and consequently our ATMs are exposed to theft and vandalism, and to attacks whereby the security of the ATM is breached electronically by transmitting a command to the ATM to dispense cash without a card being present.  We constantly monitor ATM security and take measures to protect our systems from such attacks and other breaches, but we cannot be certain that our measures will be effective against new, rapidly developing methods used by criminal elements. Although we are insured against such risks, deductibles, exclusions or limitations in such insurance may leave us bearing some or all of any losses arising from theft or vandalism of ATMs or loss of cash due to security breaches of our ATM networks. In addition, we have experienced increases in claims under our insurance, which has increased our insurance premiums.

 

Failures of third-party service providers we rely upon could lead to financial loss.

 

We rely on third party service providers to support key portions of our operations. We also rely on third party service providers to provide part or all of certain services we deliver to customers. While we have selected these third-party vendors carefully, we do not control their actions. A failure of these services by a third party could have a material impact upon our delivery of services to customers. Such a failure could lead to damage claims, loss of customers, and reputational harm, depending on the duration and severity of the failure. Third parties perform significant operational services on our behalf. These third-party vendors are subject to similar risks as us relating to cybersecurity, breakdowns or failures of their own systems or employees. One or more of our vendors may experience a cybersecurity event or operational disruption and, if any such event does occur, it may not be adequately addressed, either operationally or financially, by the third-party vendor. Certain of our vendors may have limited indemnification obligations or may not have the financial capacity to satisfy their indemnification obligations. If a critical vendor is unable to meet our needs in a timely manner or if the services or products provided by such a vendor are terminated or otherwise delayed and if we are not able to develop alternative sources for these services and products quickly and cost-effectively, our customers could be negatively impacted and it could have a material adverse effect on our business.

 

COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE

Our competition in the EFT Processing Segment, epay Segment and Money Transfer Segment includes large, well-financed companies and financial institutions larger than us with earlier entry into the market. As a result, we may lack the financial resources and access to capital needed to capture increased market share.

EFT Processing Segment - Our principal EFT Processing competitors include ATM networks owned by banks and national switches consisting of consortiums of local banks that provide outsourcing and transaction services only to banks and independent ATM deployers in that country. Large, well-financed companies offer ATM network and outsourcing services that compete with us in various markets. In some cases, these companies also sell a broader range of card and processing services than we do, and are, in some cases, willing to discount ATM services to obtain large contracts covering a broad range of services. Competitive factors in our EFT Processing Segment include network availability and response time, breadth of service offering, price to both the bank and to its customers, ATM location and access to other networks.

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epay Segment - We face competition in the epay business in all of our markets. A few multinational companies operate in several of our markets, and we therefore compete with them in a number of countries. In other markets, our competition is from smaller, local companies. Major retailers with high volumes are in a position to demand a larger share of commissions or to negotiate directly with the mobile phone operators, which may compress our margins. Additionally, certain of our content providers, including mobile phone operators have entered into direct contracts with retailers and/or have developed processing technology that diminishes or eliminates the need for intermediate processors and distributors.

Money Transfer Segment - Our primary competitors in the money transfer and bill payment business include other large money transfer companies and electronic money transmitters, as well as certain major national and regional banks, financial institutions and independent sales organizations. Our competitors include The Western Union Company and MoneyGram International Inc. The Western Union Company has a significant competitive advantage due to its greater resources and access to capital for expansion. This may allow them to offer better pricing terms to customers, which may result in a loss of our current or potential customers or could force us to lower our prices. Either of these actions could have an adverse impact on our revenues. In addition, our competitors may have the ability to devote more financial and operational resources than we can to the development of new technologies that provide improved functionality and features to their product and service offerings. If successful, their development efforts could render our product and service offerings less desirable, resulting in the loss of customers or a reduction in the price we could demand for our services. In addition to traditional money payment services, new technologies are emerging that may effectively compete with traditional money payment services, such as stored-value cards, debit networks, web-based services and digital currencies. Our continued growth depends upon our ability to compete effectively with these alternative technologies.

 

Developments in payments could materially reduce our transaction levels and revenues. 

Certain developments in the field of payments may reduce the need for ATMs, prepaid product POS terminals and money transfer agents. An example of this type of development is the use of near field technology in retail transactions, which if widely accepted in a market reduces the need for cash and can negatively impact the level of ATM transactions in that market. Advances in biometric payment solutions could have similar adverse impacts. These developments may reduce the transaction levels that we experience on our networks in the markets where they occur. Financial institutions, retailers and agents could elect to increase fees to their customers for using our services, which may cause a decline in the use of our services and have an adverse effect on our revenues. If transaction levels over our existing network of ATMs, POS terminals, agents and other distribution methods do not increase, growth in our revenues will depend primarily on increased capital investment for new sites and developing new markets, which reduces the margin we realize from our revenues.

 

The mobile phone industry is a rapidly evolving area, in which technological developments, in particular the development of new billing models (such as "all you can eat" plans) and distribution methods or services, may affect the demand for other services in a dramatic way. The development of any new models or technology that reduce the need or demand for prepaid mobile airtime could materially and adversely affect our business.


Competition in our EFT Processing Segment has increased over the last several years, increasing the risk that certain of our long-term bank outsourcing contracts may be terminated or not renewed upon expiration.

 

The developing markets in which we have done business have matured over the years, resulting in increasing competition. In addition, as consolidation of financial institutions in Central and Eastern Europe continues, certain of our customers have established or are establishing internal ATM management and processing capabilities. As a result of these developments, negotiations regarding renewal of contracts have become increasingly challenging and in certain cases we have reduced fees to extend contracts beyond their original terms. In certain other cases, contracts have been, and in the future may be, terminated by financial institutions resulting in a substantial reduction in revenue. Contract termination payments, if any, may be inadequate to replace revenues and operating income associated with these contracts. Although we have historically considered the risk of non-renewal of major contracts to be relatively low because of complex interfaces and operational procedures established for those contracts, the risk of non-renewal or early termination is increasing.

 


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GOVERNANCE MATTERS

 

We have various mechanisms in place to discourage takeover attempts, which may reduce or eliminate our stockholders' ability to sell their shares for a premium in a change of control transaction.

 

Various provisions of our certificate of incorporation and bylaws and of Delaware corporate law may discourage, delay or prevent a change in control or takeover attempt of our company by a third party which our management and board of directors opposes. Public stockholders who might desire to participate in such a transaction may not have the opportunity to do so. These anti-takeover provisions could substantially impede the ability of public stockholders to benefit from a change of control or change in our management and board of directors. These provisions include:

  • preferred stock that could be issued by our board of directors to make it more difficult for a third party to acquire, or to discourage a third party from acquiring, a majority of our outstanding voting stock;
  • classification of our directors into three classes with respect to the time for which they hold office;
  • supermajority voting requirements to amend the provision in our certificate of incorporation providing for the classification of our directors into three such classes;
  • non-cumulative voting for directors;
  • control by our board of directors of the size of our board of directors;
  • limitations on the ability of stockholders to call special meetings of stockholders;
  • advance notice requirements for nominations of candidates for election to our board of directors or for proposing matters that can be acted upon by our stockholders at stockholder meetings; and
  • an exclusive forum bylaw provision for all internal corporate claims.

Additionally, we are authorized to issue up to a total of 90 million shares of common stock, potentially diluting equity ownership of current holders and the share price of our common stock.  We believe that it is necessary to maintain a sufficient number of available authorized shares of our common stock in order to provide us with the flexibility to issue common stock for business purposes that may arise as deemed advisable by our Board. These purposes could include, among other things, (i) to declare future stock dividends or stock splits, which may increase the liquidity of our shares; (ii) the sale of stock to obtain additional capital or to acquire other companies or businesses, which could enhance our growth strategy or allow us to reduce debt if needed; (iii) use in additional stock incentive programs and (iv) other bona fide purposes. Our Board of Directors may issue the available authorized shares of common stock without notice to, or further action by, our stockholders, unless stockholder approval is required by law or the rules of the NASDAQ Global Select Market. The issuance of additional shares of common stock may significantly dilute the equity ownership of the current holders of our common stock. Further, over the course of time, all of the issued shares have the potential to be publicly traded, perhaps in large blocks. This may result in dilution of the market price of the common stock.


An additional 8.1 million shares of common stock, representing approximately 15% of the shares outstanding as of December 31, 2020, could be added to our total common stock outstanding through the exercise of options or the issuance of additional shares of our common stock pursuant to existing convertible debt and other agreements. Once issued, these shares of common stock could be traded into the market and result in a decrease in the market price of our common stock.

 

As of December 31, 2020, we had 4.1 million and 0.5 million options and restricted stock awards outstanding, respectively, held by our directors, officers and employees, which entitle these holders to acquire an equal number of shares of our common stock. Of this amount, 1.5 million options are vested and exercisable as of December 31, 2020. Approximately 0.7 million additional shares of our common stock may be issued in connection with our stock incentive and employee stock purchase plans. Accordingly, based on current trading prices of our common stock, approximately 2.0 million shares could potentially be added to our total current common stock outstanding through the exercise of options and the vesting of restricted stock awards, which could adversely impact the trading price for our stock. 

 

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Of the 4.6 million total options and restricted stock awards outstanding, an aggregate of 2.0 million options and restricted stock awards are held by persons who may be deemed to be our affiliates and who would be subject to Rule 144. Thus, upon exercise of their options or sale of shares for which restrictions have lapsed, these affiliates' shares would be subject to the trading restrictions imposed by Rule 144. The remainder of the common shares issuable under option and restricted stock award arrangements would be freely tradable in the public market. Over the course of time, all of the issued shares have the potential to be publicly traded, perhaps in large blocks. 

 

Upon the occurrence of certain events, another 2.8 million shares of common stock could be issued upon conversion of the Company's convertible notes issued in March 2019; in certain situations, the number of shares issuable could be higher. While we have stated that we intend to settle any conversion of these notes by issuing cash for the principal value of the notes and issuing shares of common stock for the conversion value in excess of the principal, which would significantly reduce the number of shares issued upon conversion, if our financial condition significantly and adversely changes, we may not be able to settle as intended should the notes be converted.

 

KEY PERSONNEL

 

Retaining the founder and key executives of our company, and of companies that we acquire, and finding and retaining qualified personnel is important to our continued success, and any inability to attract and retain such personnel could harm our operations.

 

The development and implementation of our strategy has depended in large part on the co-founder of our company, Michael J. Brown. The retention of Mr. Brown is important to our continued success. In addition, the success of the expansion of businesses that we acquire may depend in large part upon the retention of the founders or leaders of those businesses. Our success also depends in part on our ability to hire and retain highly skilled and qualified management, operating, marketing, financial and technical personnel. The competition for qualified personnel in the markets where we conduct our business is intense and, accordingly, we cannot assure you that we will be able to continue to hire or retain the required personnel.


Our officers and some of our key personnel have entered into service or employment agreements containing non-competition, non-disclosure and non-solicitation covenants, which grant incentive stock options and/or restricted stock with long-term vesting requirements. However, most of these contracts do not guarantee that these individuals will continue their employment with us. The loss of our key personnel could have a material adverse effect on our business, growth, financial condition or results of operations.

 

None.

Item 2. Properties

 

Our executive offices are located in Leawood, Kansas. As of December 31, 2020, we also have 36 principal offices in Europe, 14 in Asia Pacific, 10 in North America, three in the Middle East, two in South America and one in Africa. Our office leases generally provide for initial terms ranging from two to twelve years.

 

Our processing centers for the EFT Processing Segment are located in Germany, Hungary, India, China, and Pakistan. Processing centers we operate for the epay Segment are located in the U.K., Germany, Italy, and the U.S. Our processing centers for the Money Transfer Segment are located in the U.S., the U.K., New Zealand, and Malaysia.

 

All of our processing centers are leased and have off-site real time backup processing centers that are capable of providing full or partial processing services in the event of failure of the primary processing centers.


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The Company is, from time to time, a party to legal or regulatory proceedings arising in the ordinary course of its business.

The discussion regarding litigation in Part II, Item 8 - Financial Statements and Supplementary Data and Note 19, Litigation and Contingencies, to the Consolidated Financial Statements included elsewhere in this report is incorporated herein by reference.

 

Currently, there are no legal or regulatory proceedings that management believes, either individually or in the aggregate, would have a material adverse effect upon the Consolidated Financial Statements of the Company. In accordance with U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles ("U.S. GAAP"), we record a liability when it is both probable that a liability has been incurred and the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated. These liabilities are reviewed at least quarterly and adjusted to reflect the impacts of negotiations, settlements, rulings, advice of legal counsel, and other information and events pertaining to a particular case or proceeding. 

 

 

Not applicable.


 

 

Market Information   

 

Our common stock, $0.02 par value per share, is quoted on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol EEFT. 

 

Dividends

 

Since our inception, no dividends have been paid on our common stock. We do not intend to distribute dividends for the foreseeable future.


Holders

 

At December 31, 2020, we had 45 stockholders of record of our Common Stock, and none of our Preferred Stock was outstanding. This figure does not include an estimate of the indeterminate number of beneficial holders whose shares may be held of record by brokerage firms and clearing agencies.

 

Private Placements and Issuances of Equity 

 

During 2020, we did not issue any equity securities that were not registered under the Securities Act of 1933, which have not been previously reported in a Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q or a Current Report on Form 8-K.



34


Stock Performance Graph

 

Set forth below is a graph comparing the total cumulative return on our Common Stock from December 31, 2015 through December 31, 2020 with the Total Returns Index for U.S. companies traded on the NASDAQ Global Select Market (the "Market Group") and an index group of peer companies, the Total Returns Index for U.S. NASDAQ Financial Stocks (the "Peer Group"). Returns are based on monthly changes in price and assume reinvested dividends. These calculations assume the value of an investment in the Common Stock, the Market Group and the Peer Group was $100 on December 31, 2015.


The following performance graph and related text are being furnished to and not filed with the SEC, and will not be deemed to be "soliciting material" or subject to Regulation 14A or 14C under the Exchange Act or to the liabilities of Section 18 of the Exchange Act and will not be deemed to be incorporated by reference into any filing under the Securities Act of 1933 or the Exchange Act, except to the extent we specifically incorporate such information by reference into such filing.


Graphics


NOTE: Index Data: Calculated (or Derived) based from CRSP NASDAQ Stock Market (U.S. Companies) and CRSP NASDAQ Financial Index, Center for Research in Security Prices (CRSP®), Graduate School of Business, The University of Chicago. Copyright 2021. Used with permission. All rights reserved.


Equity Compensation Plan Information


Refer to Part II, Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data, Note 16, Stock Plans, and Part III, Item 12, Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters for information related to our equity compensation plans.



35


Stock Repurchases

 

The Company did not repurchase any shares during the quarter ended December 31, 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Period

 

Total Number of Shares Purchased

 

Average Price Paid per Share

 

Total Number of Shares Purchased as Part of Publicly Announced Plans or Programs

 

Maximum Dollar Value of Shares that May Yet Be Purchased Under the Programs (in thousands) (1)

October 1 - October 31, 2020

 

 

 

$

 

 

 

 

$

259,362

 

November 1 - November 30, 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

259,362

 

December 1 - December 31, 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

259,362

 

Total

 

 

 

$

 

 

 

 

 

 

(1) On March 11, 2019, in connection with the issuance of the Convertible Notes, the Board of Directors authorized a repurchase program of $120 million in value of Euronet’s common stock through March 11, 2021. Euronet has repurchased $110.6 million of stock under this program. On February 26, 2020, the Company put a repurchase program in place to repurchase up to $250 million in value, but not more than 5.0 million shares of common stock through February 28, 2022. Repurchases under either program may take place in the open market or in privately negotiated transactions, including derivative transactions, and may be made under a Rule 10b5-1 plan.

 

36


 

The following information should be read in conjunction with Item 7 - Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations and our Consolidated Financial Statements and accompanying notes contained in Item 8 - Financial Statements and Supplementary Data in this report. The historical results are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected in any future period.

 

   

 

Year Ended December 31,

(dollar amounts in thousands, except per share amounts)

 

2020

 

2019

 

2018

 

2017

 

2016

Income statement data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenues

 

$

2,482,700

 

 

$

2,750,109

 

 

$

2,536,629

 

 

$

2,252,422

 

 

$

1,958,615

 

Operating expenses (1)

 

2,309,057

 

 

2,163,171

 

 

2,072,694

 

 

1,891,395

 

 

1,628,313

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

127,021

 

 

111,744

 

 

106,021

 

 

95,030

 

 

80,529

 

Operating income (1)

 

46,622

 

 

475,194

 

 

357,914

 

 

265,997

 

 

249,773

 

Other expenses, net

 

(38,451

)

 

(41,387

)

 

(62,998

)

 

(9,662

)

 

(16,880

)

Income from continuing operations before income taxes

 

8,171

 

 

433,807

 

 

294,916

 

 

256,335

 

 

232,893

 

Income tax expense

 

 (11,475

)

 

(87,112

)

 

(62,785

)

 

(99,395

)

 

(58,795

)

(Loss) income from continuing operations

 

$

(3,304

 

$

346,695

 

 

$

232,131

 

 

$

156,940

 

 

$

174,098

 

(Loss) earnings per share from continuing operations:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic

 

$

(0.06

 

$

6.49

 

 

$

4.52

 

 

$

2.99

 

 

$

3.34

 

Diluted

 

$

(0.06

 

$

6.31

 

 

$

4.26

 

 

$

2.85

 

 

$

3.23

 

Balance sheet data (at period end):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets

 

$

4,926,711

 

 

$

4,657,666

 

 

$

3,321,155

 

 

$

3,140,029

 

 

$

2,712,872

 

Debt obligations, long-term portion

 

1,437,589

 

 

1,090,939

 

 

589,782

 

 

404,012

 

 

561,663

 

Finance lease obligations, long-term portion

 

6,174

 

 

8,054

 

 

8,199

 

 

9,753

 

 

6,969

 

Summary network data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of operational ATMs at end of period

 

37,729

 

 

46,070

 

 

40,354

 

 

37,133

 

 

33,973

 

EFT processing transactions during the period (millions)

 

3,275

 

 

3,052

 

 

2,721

 

 

2,352

 

 

1,885

 

Number of operational prepaid processing POS terminals at end of period (rounded)

 

748,000

 

 

728,000

 

 

719,000

 

 

683,000

 

 

661,000

 

Prepaid processing transactions during the period (millions)

 

2,395

 

 

1,542

 

 

1,149

 

 

1,186

 

 

1,294

 

Money transfer transactions during the period (millions)

 

116.5

 

 

114.5

 

 

107.6

 

 

92.2

 

 

82.3

 

___________________

 

 

(1)

The results of 2020, 2018 and 2017 include non-cash charges related to impairment of goodwill and acquired intangible assets of $106.6 million, $7.0 million and $34.1 million, respectively.

 

37



The following discussion and analysis should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. This section of this Form 10-K generally discusses 2020 and 2019 items and year-to-year comparisons between 2020 and 2019. Discussions of 2018 items and year-to-year comparisons between 2019 and 2018 that are not included in this Form 10-K can be found in "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" in Part II, Item 7 of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019.


Company Overview, Geographic Locations and Principal Products and Services 


Euronet is a leading electronic payments provider. We offer payment and transaction processing and distribution solutions to financial institutions, retailers, service providers and individual consumers. Our primary product offerings include comprehensive ATM, POS, card outsourcing, card issuing and merchant acquiring services, software solutions, electronic distribution of prepaid mobile airtime and other electronic payment products, foreign currency exchange services and global money transfer services. We operate in the following three segments:

  • The EFT Processing Segment, which processes transactions for a network of 37,729 ATMs and approximately 340,000 POS terminals across Europe, the Middle East, Asia Pacific, and the United States. We provide comprehensive electronic payment solutions consisting of ATM cash withdrawal and deposit services, ATM network participation, outsourced ATM and POS management solutions, credit and debit card outsourcing, DCC, and other value added services. Through this segment, we also offer a suite of integrated electronic financial transaction software solutions for electronic payment and transaction delivery systems.

  • The epay Segment, which provides distribution, processing and collection services for prepaid mobile airtime and other electronic content. We operate a network of approximately 748,000 POS terminals providing electronic processing of prepaid mobile airtime top-up services and other electronic content in Europe, the Middle East, Asia Pacific, the United States and South America. We also provide vouchers and physical gift fulfillment services in Europe.

  • The Money Transfer Segment, which provides global consumer-to-consumer money transfer services, primarily under the brand names Ria, IME, AFEX, and xe and global account-to-account money transfer services under the brand name xe. We offer services under the brand names Ria and IME through a network of sending agents, Company-owned stores (primarily in North America, Europe and Malaysia) and our websites (riamoneytransfer.com and online.imeremit.com), disbursing money transfers through a worldwide correspondent network that includes approximately 464,000 locations. xe is a provider of foreign currency exchange information and offers money transfer services on its currency data websites (xe.com and x-rates.com). In addition to money transfers, we also offer customers bill payment services (primarily in the U.S.), payment alternatives such as money orders and prepaid debit cards, comprehensive check cashing services for a wide variety of issued checks, along with competitive foreign currency exchange services and prepaid mobile top-up. Through our xe brand, we offer cash management solutions and foreign currency risk management services to small-to-medium-sized businesses.

We have six processing centers in Europe, five in Asia Pacific and two in North America. We have 36 principal offices in Europe, 14 in Asia Pacific, 10 in North America, three in the Middle East, two in South America and one in Africa. Our executive offices are located in Leawood, Kansas, USA. With approximately 71% of our revenues denominated in currencies other than the U.S. dollar, any significant changes in foreign currency exchange rates will likely have a significant impact on our results of operations (for a further discussion, see Item 1A - Risk Factors and Item 7A - Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk).

38


Sources of Revenues and Cash Flow


Euronet earns revenues and income primarily from ATM management fees, transaction fees, commissions and foreign currency exchange margin. Each operating segment's sources of revenues are described below.


EFT Processing Segment — Revenues in the EFT Processing Segment, which represented approximately 19% of total consolidated revenues for the year ended December 31, 2020, are derived from fees charged for transactions made by cardholders on our proprietary network of ATMs, fixed management fees and transaction fees we charge to customers for operating ATMs and processing debit and credit cards under outsourcing and cross-border acquiring agreements, foreign currency exchange margin on DCC transactions, domestic and international surcharge, foreign currency dispensing and other value added services such as advertising, prepaid telecommunication recharges, bill payment, and money transfers provided over ATMs. Revenues in this segment are also derived from cardless payment, banknote recycling, tax refund services, license fees, professional services and maintenance fees for proprietary application software and sales of related hardware.


epay Segment — Revenues in the epay Segment, which represented approximately 33% of total consolidated revenues for the year ended December 31, 2020, are primarily derived from commissions or processing fees received from mobile phone operators for the processing and distribution of prepaid mobile airtime and commissions earned from the distribution of other electronic content, vouchers, and physical gifts. The proportion of epay Segment revenues earned from the distribution of prepaid mobile phone time as compared with other electronic products has decreased over time, and digital media content now produces approximately 65% of epay Segment revenues. Other electronic content offered by this segment includes digital content such as music, games and software, as well as, other products including prepaid long distance calling card plans, prepaid Internet plans, prepaid debit cards, gift cards, vouchers, transport payments, lottery payments, bill payment, and money transfer.


Money Transfer Segment — Revenues in the Money Transfer Segment, which represented approximately 48% of total consolidated revenues for the year ended December 31, 2020, are primarily derived from transaction fees, as well as the margin earned from purchasing foreign currency at wholesale exchange rates and selling the foreign currency to customers at retail exchange rates. We have a sending agent network in place comprised of agents, customer service representatives, Company-owned stores, primarily in North America, Europe and Malaysia, and Ria, and xe branded websites, along with a worldwide network of correspondent agents, consisting primarily of financial institutions in the transfer destination countries. Sending and correspondent agents each earn fees for cash collection and distribution services, which are recognized as direct operating costs at the time of sale.


The Company offers a money transfer product called Walmart-2-Walmart Money Transfer Service which allows customers to transfer money to and from Walmart stores in the U.S. Our Ria business executes the transfers with Walmart serving as both the sending agent and payout correspondent. Ria earns a lower margin from these transactions than its traditional money transfers; however, the arrangement has added a significant number of transactions to Ria's business. The agreement with Walmart establishes Ria as the only party through which Walmart will sell U.S. domestic money transfers branded with Walmart marks. The agreement is effective until April 2023. Thereafter, it will automatically renew for subsequent one year terms unless either party provides notice to the contrary. The agreement imposes certain obligations on each party, the most significant being service level requirements by Ria and money transfer compliance requirements by Walmart. Any violation of these requirements by Ria could result in an obligation to indemnify Walmart or termination of the contract by Walmart. However, the agreement allows the parties to resolve disputes by mutual agreement without termination of the agreement.

Corporate Services, Eliminations and Other — In addition to operating in our principal operating segments described above, our "Corporate Services, Eliminations and Other" category includes non-operating activity, certain inter-segment eliminations and the cost of providing corporate and other administrative services to the operating segments, including most share-based compensation expense. These services are not directly identifiable with our reportable operating segments.

 

39


Opportunities and Challenges

Our expansion plans and opportunities are focused on eight primary areas:

  • increasing the number of ATMs and cash deposit terminals in our independent ATM networks;
  • increasing transactions processed on our network of owned and operated ATMs and POS devices;
  • signing new outsourced ATM and POS terminal management contracts;
  • expanding value added services and other products offered by our EFT Processing Segment, including the sale of DCC, acquiring and other prepaid card services to banks and retailers;
  • expanding our epay processing network and portfolio of digital content;
  • expanding our money transfer services, cross-currency payments products and bill payment network;
  • expanding our cash management solutions and foreign currency risk management services; and
  • developing our credit and debit card outsourcing business.

EFT Processing Segment — The continued expansion and development of our EFT Processing Segment business will depend on various factors including, but not limited to, the following:

  • the impact of competition by banks and other ATM operators and service providers in our current target markets;
  • the demand for our ATM outsourcing services in our current target markets;
  • our ability to develop products or services, including value added services, to drive increases in transactions and revenues;
  • the expansion of our various business lines in markets where we operate and in new markets;
  • our entry into additional card acceptance and ATM management agreements with financial institutions;
  • our ability to obtain required licenses in markets we intend to enter or expand services;
  • our ability to enter into sponsorship agreements where our licenses are not applicable;
  • our ability to enter into and renew ATM network cash supply agreements with financial institutions;
  • the availability of financing for expansion;
  • our ability to efficiently install ATMs contracted under newly awarded outsourcing agreements;
  • our ability to renew existing contracts at profitable rates;
  • our ability to maintain pricing at current levels or mitigate price reductions in certain markets;
  • the impact of changes in rules imposed by international card organizations such as Visa® and Mastercard® on card transactions on ATMs, including reductions in ATM interchange fees, restrictions on the ability to apply direct access fees, the ability to offer DCC transactions on ATMs, and increases in fees charged on DCC transactions;
  • the impact of changes in laws and regulations affecting the profitability of our services, including regulation of DCC transactions by the E.U.;
  • the impact of overall market trends on ATM transactions in our current target markets:
  • our ability to expand and sign additional customers for the cross-border merchant processing and acquiring business;
  • the continued development and implementation of our software products and their ability to interact with other leading products; and
  • the impact of government imposed restrictions on travel into countries where we operate ATMs.


40


We consistently evaluate and add prospects to our list of potential ATM outsource customers. However, we cannot predict the increase or decrease in the number of ATMs we manage under outsourcing agreements because this depends largely on the willingness of banks to enter into outsourcing contracts with us. Due to the thorough internal reviews and extensive negotiations conducted by existing and prospective banking customers in choosing outsource vendors, the process of entering into or renewing outsourcing agreements can take several months. The process is further complicated by the legal and regulatory considerations of local countries. These agreements tend to cover large numbers of ATMs, so significant increases and decreases in our pool of managed ATMs could result from the acquisition or termination of one or more of these management contracts. Therefore, the timing of both current and new contract revenues is uncertain and unpredictable.


Software products are an integral part of our product lines, and our investment in research, development, delivery and customer support reflects our ongoing commitment to an expanded customer base.


epay Segment — The continued expansion and development of the epay Segment business will depend on various factors, including, but not limited to, the following:

  • our ability to maintain and renew existing agreements, and to negotiate new agreements in additional markets with mobile operators, digital content providers, agent financial institutions and retailers;
  • our ability to use existing expertise and relationships with mobile operators, digital content providers and retailers to our advantage;
  • the continued use of third-party providers such as ourselves to supply electronic processing solutions for existing and additional digital content;
  • the development of mobile phone networks in the markets in which we do business and the increase in the number of mobile phone users;
  • the overall pace of growth in the prepaid mobile phone and digital content market, including consumer shifts between prepaid and postpaid services;
  • our market share of the retail distribution capacity;
  • the development of new technologies that may compete with POS distribution of prepaid mobile airtime and other products;
  • the level of commission that is paid to the various intermediaries in the electronic payment distribution chain;
  • our ability to fully recover monies collected by retailers;
  • our ability to add new and differentiated products in addition to those offered by mobile operators;
  • our ability to develop and effectively market additional value added services;
  • our ability to take advantage of cross-selling opportunities with our EFT Processing and Money Transfer Segments, including providing money transfer services through our distribution network;
  • the availability of financing for further expansion; and
  • the impact of government imposed restrictions on retailers with whom we partner.

In all of the markets in which we operate, we are experiencing significant competition which will impact the rate at which we may be able to grow organically. Competition among prepaid mobile airtime and electronic content distributors results in the increase of commissions paid to retailers and increases in retailer attrition rates. To grow, we must capture market share from other prepaid mobile airtime and electronic content distributors, offer a superior product offering and demonstrate the value of a global network. In certain markets in which we operate, many of the factors that may contribute to rapid growth (growth in electronic content, expansion of our network of retailers and access to products of mobile operators and other content providers) remain present.


41


Money Transfer Segment The continued expansion and development of our Money Transfer Segment business will depend on various factors, including, but not limited to, the following:
  • the continued growth in worker migration and employment opportunities;
  • the mitigation of economic and political factors that have had an adverse impact on money transfer volumes, such as changes in the economic sectors in which immigrants work and the developments in immigration policies in the countries in which we operate;
  • the continuation of the trend of increased use of electronic money transfer and bill payment services among high-income individuals, immigrant workers and the unbanked population in our markets;
  • our ability to maintain our agent and correspondent networks;
  • our ability to offer our products and services or develop new products and services at competitive prices to drive increases in transactions;
  • the development of new technologies that may compete with our money transfer network, and our ability to acquire, develop and implement new technologies;
  • the expansion of our services in markets where we operate and in new markets;
  • our ability to strengthen our brands;
  • our ability to fund working capital requirements;
  • our ability to recover from agents funds collected from customers and our ability to recover advances made to correspondents;
  • our ability to maintain compliance with the regulatory requirements of the jurisdictions in which we operate or plan to operate;
  • our ability to take advantage of cross-selling opportunities with our epay Segment, including providing prepaid services through our stores and agents worldwide;
  • our ability to leverage our banking and merchant/retailer relationships to expand money transfer corridors to Europe, Asia and Africa, including high growth corridors to Central and Eastern European countries;
  • the availability of financing for further expansion;
  • the ability to maintain banking relationships necessary for us to service our customers;
  • our ability to successfully expand our agent network in Europe using our payment institution licenses under the Second Payment Services Directive ("PSD2") and using our various licenses in the United States;
  • our ability to provide additional value-added products under the xe brand; and
  • the impact of government imposed restrictions on our network of agents and correspondents.

The accounting policies of each segment are the same as those referenced in the summary of significant accounting policies (see Note 3, Summary of Significant Accounting Policies and Practices, to the Consolidated Financial Statements).

For all segments, our continued expansion may involve additional acquisitions that could divert our resources and management time and require integration of new assets with our existing networks and services. Our ability to effectively manage our growth has required us to expand our operating systems and employee base, particularly at the management level, which has added incremental operating costs. An inability to continue to effectively manage expansion could have a material adverse effect on our business, growth, financial condition or results of operations. Inadequate technology and resources would impair our ability to maintain current processing technology and efficiencies, as well as deliver new and innovative services to compete in the marketplace.



42


COVID-19

The outbreak of the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic has resulted in varying degrees of travel restrictions and shelter-in-place and other social distancing orders in most of the countries where the Company operates during the year ended December 31, 2020. Although the majority of these orders went into effect in late February 2020 or early March 2020, new orders continue to be implemented, or reinstated, as the pandemic spreads around the globe and there is a resurgence of infections. The EFT Segment has experienced declines in certain transaction volumes due to these restrictions, especially high-margin cross-border transactions. The epay Segment has experienced the impacts of consumer movement restrictions in certain markets, while other markets have been positively impacted where the Company has a higher mix of digital distribution or a higher concentration of retailers that are deemed essential and have remained open during the pandemic.

 

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic driven impacts, the Company implemented several key measures to offset the impact across the business, including renegotiating certain third party contracts, reducing travel, decreasing capital expenditures, and expanding ATM seasonal deactivations (placing them in dormancy status, terminating, or re-negotiating) in more sites and more markets.


Segment Revenues and Operating Income For The Years Ended December 31, 2020 and 2019

 

 

 

Revenues

 

Operating Income (Expense)

(in thousands)

 

2020

 

2019

 

2020

 

2019

EFT Processing

 

$

468,726

 

 

$

888,712

 

 

$

(66,711)

 

 

$

296,640

 

epay

 

835,517

 

 

769,329

 

 

96,678

 

 

89,204

 

Money Transfer

 

1,183,849

 

 

1,096,226

 

 

59,709

 

 

134,790

 

Total

 

2,488,092

 

 

2,754,267

 

 

89,676

 

 

520,634

 

Corporate services, eliminations and other

 

(5,392)

 

(4,158

)

 

(43,054)

 

(45,440

)

Total

 

$

2,482,700

 

 

$

2,750,109

 

 

$

46,622

 

 

$

475,194

 

 
Summary

 

Our annual consolidated revenues decreased by 10% for 2020 compared to 2019. The decrease in revenues for 2020 was primarily due to a decrease in the number of ATMs under management, along with a decrease in demand for DCC, domestic and international surcharge and other value added services in our EFT Processing Segment, partially offset by growth in the number of money transfers processed by the core Ria business and the number of transactions processed by our epay subsidiaries.


The decrease in operating income for 2020 was primarily due to the decrease in ATMs under management, along with the decrease in demand for DCC, domestic and international surcharge, other value added services and the $106.6 million non-cash impairment of goodwill and acquired intangible assets, partially offset by the increase in the number of money transfer transactions processed, and the increase in the number of transactions processed for epay.


Net loss attributable to Euronet for 2020 was $3.4 million, or $0.06 per diluted share and net income attributable to Euronet for 2019 was $346.7 million, or $6.31 per diluted share.



43


Impact of changes in foreign currency exchange rates

 

Our revenues and local expenses are recorded in the functional currencies of our operating entities, and then are translated into U.S. dollars for reporting purposes; therefore, amounts we earn outside the U.S. are negatively impacted by a stronger U.S. dollar and positively impacted by a weaker U.S. dollar. Considering the results by country and the associated functional currency, our 2020 consolidated operating income was approximately 7% higher due to changes in foreign currency exchange rates when compared to 2019. If significant, in our discussion we will refer to the impact of fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates in our comparison of operating segment results.

To provide further perspective on the impact of foreign currency exchange rates, the following table shows the changes in values relative to the U.S. dollar during 2020 and 2019, of the currencies of the countries in which we have our most significant operations:

 

 

Average Translation Rate Year Ended December 31,

 

2020 Increase (Decrease) Percent

Currency

 

2020

 

2019

 

Australian dollar

 

$

0.6904

 

 

$

0.6954

 

 

(1)

%

British pound

 

$

1.2835

 

 

$

1.2771

 

 

1

%

euro

 

$

1.1412

 

 

$

1.1194

 

 

2

%

Hungarian forint

 

$

0.0033

 

 

$

0.0034

 

 

(3)

%

Indian rupee

 

$

0.0135

 

 

$

0.0142

 

 

(5)

%

Malaysian ringgit

 

$

0.2383

 

 

$

0.2416

 

 

(1)

%

New Zealand dollar

 

$

0.6504

 

 

$

0.6591

 

 

(1)

%

Polish zloty

 

$

0.2571

 

 

$

0.2606

 

 

(1)

%

44


Comparison of Operating Results For The Years Ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 - By Operating Segment

 

EFT Processing Segment

 

The following table summarizes the results of operations for our EFT Processing Segment for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019:


 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

Year-over-Year Change

(dollar amounts in thousands)

 

2020

 

2019

 

Increase (Decrease) Amount

 

Increase (Decrease) Percent

Total revenues

 

$

468,726

 

 

$

888,712

 

 

$

(419,986)

 

 

(47)

 %

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Direct operating costs

 

302,637

 

 

397,132

 

 

(94,495)

 

 

(24)

 %

Salaries and benefits

 

91,526

 

 

87,603

 

 

3,923

 

 

4

 %

Selling, general and administrative

 

35,388

 

 

35,518

 

 

(130)

 

(0)

 %
Goodwill and acquired intangible assets impairment

21,861





21,861



n/m

Depreciation and amortization

 

84,025

 

 

71,819

 

 

12,206

 

 

17

 %

Total operating expenses

 

535,437

 

 

592,072

 

 

(56,635)

 

 

(10)

 %

Operating (loss) income

 

$

(66,711)

 

 

$

296,640

 

 

$

(363,351)

 

 

(122)

 %

Transactions processed (millions)

 

3,275

 

 

3,052

 

 

223

 

 

7

 %

ATMs in service as of December 31

 

37,729

 

 

46,070

 

 

(8,341)

 

 

(18)

 %

Average ATMs in service during the year

 

42,126

 

 

44,756

 

 

(2,630)

 

 

(6)

 %

____________________

n/m — Not meaningful.

Revenues


EFT Processing Segment total revenues were $468.7 million for 2020, a decrease of $420.0 million or 47% compared to 2019. Total revenues for 2020 decreased due to the impact of fewer active ATMs and fewer high-margin cross-border transactions (DCC), related to COVID-19 pandemic-driven government-imposed border and business closures and shelter-in-place orders. The government imposed border and business closures and shelter-in-place orders were in effect for the majority of 2020. These closures resulted in a decrease in revenues for 2020 compared to 2019. Foreign currency movements decreased total revenues by approximately $1.0 million for 2020 compared to 2019.


Average monthly revenues per ATM decreased to $927 for 2020 compared to $1,655 for 2019. Revenues per transaction decreased to $0.14 for 2020 compared to $0.29 for 2019. The decreases in average monthly revenues per ATM and revenue per transaction were attributable to the decreases in DCC and surcharge transactions, which earn higher revenues per transaction than other ATM or card-based services. The decrease in DCC transactions was due to the decline in tourism throughout Europe driven by the border and business closures during 2020.


Direct operating costs


EFT Processing Segment direct operating costs were $302.6 million for 2020, a decrease of $94.5 million or 24% compared to 2019. Direct operating costs in the EFT Processing Segment consist primarily of site rental fees, cash delivery costs, cash supply costs, maintenance, insurance, telecommunications, payment scheme processing fees, data center operations-related personnel, as well as the processing centers' facility-related costs and other processing center-related expenses and commissions paid to retail merchants, banks and card processors involved with POS DCC transactions. The decrease in direct operating costs was primarily due to the decrease in the number of ATMs under management, renegotiated and reduced site rental fees, and reduced operating costs for ATM's seasonally deactivated during COVID-19 pandemic imposed restrictions. Foreign currency movements decreased direct operating costs by approximately $1.0 million for 2020 compared to 2019.

45


Gross profit


Gross profit, which is calculated as revenues less direct operating costs, was $166.1 million for 2020, a decrease of $325.5 million or 66% compared to $491.6 million for 2019. Gross profit as a percentage of revenues ("gross margin") decreased to 35.4% for 2020 compared to 55.3% for 2019. The decrease in gross profit and gross margin was attributable to decreases in DCC and domestic and international surcharge transactions.


Salaries and benefits


Salaries and benefits expenses were $91.5 million for 2020, an increase $3.9 million or 4compared to 2019. The increase in salaries and benefits was primarily attributable to additional headcount to support expansion in the United States and long-term growth strategy, partially offset by a decrease in bonus expense. The border and business closures and shelter-in-place orders that took effect in late February 2020 and March 2020 in response to the COVID-19 pandemic reduced transaction volumes and revenues through the end of 2020. High-margin cross-border transactions and revenues for 2020 decreased compared to 2019 as a result. However, human resources to support actual and planned growth were added throughout 2019 as well as the early part of 2020 before the COVID-19 pandemic took effect.  As a percentage of revenues, these expenses increased to 19.5% for 2020 compared to 9.9% for 2019. The Company made a decision to retain its employees during the pandemic.


Selling, general and administrative

Selling, general and administrative expenses were $35.4 million for 2020, a decrease of $0.1 million or flat compared to 2019. As a percentage of revenues these expenses increased to 7.5% for 2020 compared to 4.0% for 2019. The increase was primarily due to an increase in bad debt expense, partially offset by a decrease in travel related expenses. 

Goodwill and acquired intangible assets impairment

Due to the economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Company recorded a $21.9 million non-cash goodwill impairment charge related to two reporting units during the second quarter of 2020. A $14.0 million non-cash goodwill impairment charge was recorded for Innova as a result of the decline in VAT refund activity directly related to the decline in international tourism within the European Union, and a $7.9 million non-cash goodwill impairment charge was recorded for Pure Commerce related to the decline in international tourism in Asia Pacific.

Depreciation and amortization

Depreciation and amortization expenses were $84.0 million for 2020, an increase of $12.2 million or 17% compared to 2019. The increase was primarily attributable to the deployment of additional ATMs (and subsequent seasonal deactivation) and software assets. As a percentage of revenues these expenses increased to 17.9% for 2020 compared to 8.1% for 2019.


Operating (loss) income


EFT Processing Segment operating loss was $66.7 million for 2020, a decrease of $363.4 million or 122% compared to 2019 operating incomeOperating loss as a percentage of revenues ("operating margin") was (14.2%) for 2020 compared to operating income as a percentage of revenues of 33.4% for 2019 and operating loss per transaction was ($0.02) for 2020 compared to operating income per transaction of $0.10 for 2019The decreases in operating income, operating margin, and operating income per transaction were primarily due to the decrease in revenues for 2020 compared to 2019 and the non-cash goodwill impairment charges. Beginning in late February 2020 and throughout December 2020, high margin cross-border transactions (DCC) decreased throughout Europe due to the COVID-19 pandemic driven government imposed border and business closures and shelter-in-place orders.

46


epay Segment

 

The following table summarizes the results of operations for our epay Segment for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019:

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

Year-over-Year Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

Increase (Decrease) Amount

 

Increase (Decrease) Percent

(dollar amounts in thousands)

 

2020

 

2019

 

 

Total revenues

 

$

835,517

 

 

$

769,329

 

 

$

66,188

 

 

9

 %

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Direct operating costs

 

630,391

 

 

576,757

 

 

53,634

 

 

9

 %

Salaries and benefits

 

64,769

 

 

61,540

 

 

3,229

 

 

5

 %

Selling, general and administrative

 

35,789

 

 

35,054

 

 

735

 

2

 %

Depreciation and amortization

 

7,890

 

 

6,774

 

 

1,116

 

16

 %

Total operating expenses

 

738,839

 

 

680,125

 

 

58,714

 

 

9

 %

Operating income

 

$

96,678

 

 

$

89,204

 

 

$

7,474

 

 

8

 %

Transactions processed (billions)

 

2.40

 

 

1.54

 

 

0.86

 

 

56

 %


Revenues


epay Segment total revenues were $835.5 million for 2020, an increase of $66.2 million or 9% compared to 2019. Revenue was higher by approximately $10 million related to a temporary increase in available margin provided by a mobile operator which was entirely passed on to the retailer. The remaining increase in total revenues was primarily due to an increase in the number of transactions processed driven by continued digital media growth